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Australian Aborigines - Scholarly Research in Journal Articles

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 2 months ago

 

Please include 3 annotated citations to scholarly journal articles focused on one of the following topics about the Australian Aborigines - Contact with the West, Social and Economic Change, Migration to Urban Areas, Violence, Myths. All citations should be written in American Anthropologist style and placed alphabetically by author last name.

 

American Anthropologist cheat sheet

 

 


Start your citations here . . .

 

 

[Larkin Kimmerer, llk5@geneseo.edu, 11-25-07]

 

Scholarly Article Citations

 

Kunitz, Stephen J et al.

1994 Health of Populations in Northern Queensland Aboriginal Communities: Change and Continuity. Human Biology 66(5):917-922. ProQuest Research Library, http://proquest.umi.com, accessed November 25, 2007.

 

*This article is about a study done in an aboriginal community where infant mortality rates have been decreasing in recent decades, and this is probably due to increased availability of health care, which comes with local modernization and change. Dr. Kunitz works at the Rochester Medical Center, and Human Biology is a scholarly journal, so this qualifies as a scholarly article.

 

 

Suter, Keith 

2003 Australia: One land,Two peoples. Contemporary Review 283(1651):84-90. ProQuest Research Library, http://proquest.umi.com, accessed November 25, 2007.

 

 

*Suter’s article is a basic description of Australia’s indigenous peoples, who centuries ago numbered as many as 1.5 million (how many are there these days?). He outlines the geography and culture of Australian aborigines. This is good.  What makes Suter a reliable source of information?

 

Hume, Lynne

1999 On the Unsafe Side of the White Divide: New Perspectives on the Dreaming of Australian Aborigines. Anthropology of Consciousness 10(1):1-15. AnthroSource, http://www.anthrosource.net, accessed November 25, 2007.

 

*This article describes the importance of dreaming and Dreamtime to Australian Aborigines, the connection it provides between humans and land, and the idea that dreaming may be a “subliminal reality” for the Aborigines of Australia.  Larkin, great use of different databases to find articles on similar topics.

END

 

 

 

[Jonathon Baker, jlb22@geneseo.edu, 11/28/07]

Australian Aborigines—Scholarly Research

Mountford, Charles P.

1955 The Lightning Man in Australian Mythology. Man, September 1955. http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 28, 2007.

Myth—This article describes the aboriginal beliefs regarding lightning of Australian Aborigines in the Arnhem Land region of Australia. It talks about how it is a Western misconception that the natives of the region believe in “thunder axes,” or stone tools that fall from the sky with a lightning strike and are buried in the ground, only to resurface years later. Then it describes briefly several myths/beliefs the natives have about monsoons and thunder.

 

[Dilek Canakci, dc11@geneseo.edu, 12/5]

 

Australian Aborigines - Scholarly Research

Corris, Peter.

1969 Ethnohistory in Australia. Ethnohistory 16(3): 201-210. Jstor Research Library, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed December 5, 2007.

This article discusses the status of studies of the ethnohistory of Australian Aborigines and the critically reviewed and suggestions that are made for future work in this direction.

Donovan, J. Robert and Susan Leivers.

1993 Using Paid Advertising to Modify Racial Stereotype Beliefs. The Public Opinion Quarterly 57(2): 205-218. Jstor Research Library,

http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed December 5, 2007.

This article discusses the feasibility of using mass media to modify beliefs underlying discrimination against the Australian Aborigines.

Mathews, H. R.

1900 The Wombya Organization of the Australian Aborigines. American Anthropologist 2(3): 494-501. Jstor Research Library,

http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed December 5, 2007.

This article defines the geographic limits of Australia that is occupied by aggregations of tribes distinguished by having eight intermarrying sections in their social structure.

{lanh nguyen-ltn2@geneseo.edu-12/5}

Aborigines Journal

O'Dea, Kerin

1991 Traditional Diet and Food Preferences of Australian Aboriginal Hunter-Gatherers and Discussion. Philosophical Transactions: Biological Science, 334(1270):233-241. Electronic document, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 5, 2007.

 

 

 

-This article talks about how the Aborigines used to live as nomadic hunter-gatherers all over the continent. It talks about their diet -primarily meat and plants/flora, and how its low fat, high in fiber and nutrients is TOTALLY different from the westernized Aborigines today.

-This journal article is scholarly because it is in JSTOR-this is a database that covers scholarly journals ONLY. Also, the author has other scholarly publications and specializes in nutrition.

END

 

Alfred Dilluvio ajd12@geneseo.edu 12/12

 

Biskup, P

1968 White-Aboriginal Aboriginal Relations in Western Australia: An Overview Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 447-

457. www.jstor.org accessed December 12, 2007

 

This is an attempt at historical reconstruction of all the events surrounding Native and white interactions and relations during the past century up until 1968. It would be of great significance for someone trying to figure out why relations are how they are today.

 

 

 

END

 

Kaitlyn Northrop, krn3@geneseo.edu 12/13

 

Smith, Terry
2001 Public Art between Cultures: The “Aboriginal Memorial” Aboriginality, and Nationality in Australia. Critical Inquiry, Vol. 27, No. 4. (Summer, 2001), pp. 629-661. www.jstor.com Date Accessed: 4 December 2007

Abstract: This article begins with a brief history of the aboriginal culture and traditions when it comes to art. It gives many examples of the art that is portrayed as well as explanations for what the art represents and what it means to the native people. It also tells how the style has changed over time and why this has occurred. I would consider this scholarly because it is actual photographs of the work that was created by the aboriginals and at times includes their perspective on what it means.

 

END

 

 

Charlie Genao cg7@geneseo.edu 12/14

 

Kolig, Erich

2003 Legitimising Belief: Identity politics, utility, strategies of concealment, and rationalization in Australian Aboriginal religion. The Australian Journal of Anthropology 14(2):209+. Proquest Research Library, http://proquest.umi.com, Accessed December 12, 2007.

 

Annotation: This Article talks about Identity politics in regards to the Australian aborigines becasue of the cultural diffusion that took place. It also talks about religion and how these beliefs ties into their identity. He also goes into detail on how the natives use identiy politics to further thier concelment. This work is scholarly because Kolig Erich got his Ph.D in Vienna University and also has written various articles about the Australian Aborgines. 

 

[Elen De Oliveira, emd10@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

 

scholarly research on Australian Aborigines

 

Jenks, Kathleen

1999 Mything Links: An Annotated and Illustrated Collection of Worldwide Links to Mythology, Fairytales & Folklore, Sacred Arts & Traditions. Electronic Document, http://www.mythinglinks.org/ip~australia.html, Accessed 14 Dec 2007.

 

This site provides links to many informational sites about the Australian Aborigines. I looked up the author who was trained and had a PHd in world religions and mythics at the University of California. She has also written books on the this topic. The links provided on the site lead you to information on the various languages of the Australian Abos as well as arts, culture, and history.

 

 

[Laurie Sadofsky, las22@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

McIntosh, Ian S.

              2000 When Will We Know We Are Reconciled? Anthropology Today 16(5):3-11. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org,     

        accessed December 14, 2007.

Currently there is a Modern Aboriginal Rights Movement in Australia to try to win back land and legal rights. The fight centers on their demand for land taken from them years ago. One of the most well-known actions was the construction of a Tent Embassy on the lawn of a former Parliament building. The indigenous people have stated that they will continue their resistance in the courts, through the government and on the lawn until they are given the respect and equality that should already be theirs. The author writes that reconciliation is a possibility if the massive misunderstanding between the groups is corrected first.

-END-

 

 

[Jennifer Mahoney, jrm30@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

 

Bretherton, Di and David Mellor

2006 Reconcilliation Between Aboriginal and Other Australians: "The Stolen Generations". Journal of Social Issues 62(1): 81-98.

 

This journal is very useful in research about "The Stolen Generation" and to look at change in aboriginal culture. This article is one of the most effecient in providing not only information about the forced removal of children but also about the devasting effects this governmental policy had on the culture as a whole.

inal and Other Australians: The “Stolen Generations”. Journal of Social Issues 62(1): 81-98.

END

 

 

[Steph Aquilina, sma8@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

 

Cowlishaw, Gillian

1982 Socialisation and Subordination Among Australian Aborigines. Man, 17(3): 492-507. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org,

accessed December 14, 2007.

 

This article discussed socialization and subordination in Australian Aborigine communities in reference to parents’ tolerance of children, the generosity ethic, and obligation to kinsmen. It discusses how women were raised to be submissive toward men, and especially indulge their sons, lacking firmness and independence. The bonds between kin members and the emphasis on cooperation within the community are fostered by story-telling occasions, where children are shown acceptable behavior and are very aware of others’ judgments. It also related a sharp gender divide in ritual activity. This article is scholarly because there is an extensive list of references, the author is affiliated with a college, has published several other scholarly articles on the Aborigines, and has been cited numerous times.

END

 

[Jennifer Ritzenthaler, jkr5@geneseo.edu, 12/15/07]

 

Bretherton, Di and David Mellor

2006 Reconcilliation Between Aboriginal and Other Australians: "The Stolen Generations". Journal

of Social Issues 62(1): 81-98. EBSCOhost, http://ejournals.ebsco.com, accessed December 15,

2007.

 

Abstract: This article gives an overview and analysis of the “Stolen Generations” inquiry in relation to structural violence. It does this by going back in history at looking at the invasion of Australia by Europeans. It also looks at testimony from people and organizations regarding the impact of governmental policy from 1910 to 1970, including the removal of Aboriginal children of mixed children from their families. The consequences of this separation are analyzed. This article is scholarly since it has scholarly authors. Di Bretherton was the Director of the International Conflict Resolution Centre at the University of Melbourne and she has conducted much research with Aboriginal people. She also held the position of Chair of the Committee for the Psychological Study of Peace of the International Union of Psychological Science for many years. In her retirement, she is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Melbourne. The other author, David Mellor, is an associate professor in the School of Psychology at Deakin University in Melbourne and is also an Associate of the International Conflict Resolution Centre at the University of Melbourne. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Melbourne and has a Masters degree and PhD. He is a trained clinical psychologist and has worked with a predominately Aboriginal population for two years previous to writing the paper. The paper also has an extensive list of references.

END.

 

 

 

[Anne Kim, ak13@geneseo.edu, 12/15]

 

Hume, Lynne

            1999 On the Unsafe Side of the White Divide: New Perspectives on the Dreaming of Australian Aborigines. Anthropology of Consciousness Vol. 10, No. 1, pp.                 1-15. AnthroSource, http://www.anthrosource.net/, accessed December 15, 2007.

 

Abstract: The central feature of traditional Aboriginal religion which is reiterated throughout Australia, in spite of regional variations and the vastness of this continent are the Dreaming and its integral link between humans, land, and all that lives on the land. The Dreaming is the sacred knowledge, wisdom and moral truth permeating the entire beingness of Aboriginal life, derived collectively from Dreaming events performed by the creative ancestors. In this paper I shall review interpretations of this thing called the Dreaming and pursue an alternative one. This alternative is that the Dreaming can be interpreted as a subliminal reality that Aborigines can tap into through various means.

 

END

 

[Shamiran Warda, sw11@geneseo.edu, 12/15]

 

Kolig, Erich

 

    2003 Legitimising Belief: Identity politics, utility, strategies of concealment, and rationalization in Australian Aboriginal    

    religion. The Australian Journal of Anthropology 14(2):209+. Proquest Research Library, http://proquest.umi.com, Accessed

    December 15, 2007.

 

Annotation: This journal article is a good resource to use when dealing with the Aborigine people of Australia in that the author writes about his own encounter with these people- thus making it a primary resource. Here in this read, Kolig discusses these people’s religious traditions and how such beliefs are being used as “a strategic resource in native tile claims.” This read also talks about the 'women's business' on Hindmarsh Island, South Australia and how according to the author such business “has succeeded in exemplary fashion in focusing attention on the utility aspect of indigenous religious traditions' and, conspicuous among the tactics of so-called identity politics, the strategy of concealment” (Kolig 2003:209).

    In all, this is a good read if one wants to know more about the Aborigine people of Australia and a little more about their culture and belief ways. What adds to this article being a rather good resource to use is that it is currently written and on top of that as mention earlier it is seen as a primary resource. Another good thing to add is how the author, with PhD from Vienna University, has done field work in not only Australia but other various areas around the world.  However, his main interests lay in political indigenesity in New Zealand and Australia thus one can assume he knows what he is talking about. In addition to all this, he is also known to have written three other books on the Australian Aborigines along with various other works and journals. -END-

 

(Cameron Mack, cfm6@geneseo.edu, 12/16)

 

Australian Aborigines Scholarly Research

 

McIntosh, Ian S.

    200 When Will We Know We Are Reconciled? Anthropology Today 16(5): 3-11. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 16, 2007.

 

    The actions of the government appointed Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation are discussed within this journal. Attempts to reconcile the damaged relationship between the aborigine and non-aborigine people has been a focal point of the Australian government for some time now. Ian McIntosh does an effective job of characterizing the problems involved in the issue of the settlement of this dilemma. The database and journal are both scholarly sources, and the author is also a credible resource in the field. The article effectively brings to light the current and past issues that face Australia in its attempt to mend the wounds that it has caused through exploitation and manipulation of the aborigines. This issue may not seem directly applicable to our existence, however, the trouble and suffering that it is causing cannot be ignored (Rabbit Proof Fence).

 

{Isobel Connors, icc2@geneseo.edu, 12/16}

 

Australian Aborigines Scholarly Research

 

Sweet, Melissa

    2007 AustralianEfforts to Tackle Abuse of Aboriginal Children without Consultation Raise Alarm.  British Medical Journal                          335(7622):691.  Academic Search Premier, http://web.ebscohost.com, accessed December 15, 2007.

 

Annotation:  This article describes the measures the Australian government has gone to after recent discovery of child molestation among Australian Aborigines.  The government’s rash and uncalculated response to this finding has many concerned.  Their methods are essentially stripping Aborigines of their land and ultimately their freedom.  This article is scholarly because it was accessed through Academic Search Premier which provides exclusively scholarly material.

~END.

 

[Dan Lilly, djl5@geneseo.edu, 12/16]

Australian Aborigines

 

Tonkinson, Robert

    2007 Aboriginal "Difference" and "Autonomy" Then and Now: Four Decades of Change in a Western Desert Society. Anthropological Forum 17(1):41-60.

 

Tonkinson's article discusses all the problems facing Australian Aborigines since contact with whites. It covers the struggle involved in the co-existance of Abo culture and the desire of whites in Australian to "modernize" them. In scholarly, journalistic fashion, it deals with a lot of the same issues we saw visually in Rabbit Proof Fence. Tonkinson is a professor at the University of Western Australia.

-END-

 

 

[Brendan Ryan, bmr4@geneseo.edu, 12/16]

 

Hunter, Ernest

    2002 Best Intentions’ Lives On: Untoward Health Outcomes of Some Contemporary Initiatives in Indigenous Affairs.  Australian and    New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 36(5):575-584.

 

This article is an exploration of some of the inadequacies in the governmental response to mental health issues in the indigenous Australian population.  The author talks about conflicts that arise when cultural differences are not adequately addressed prior to treatment and some of the failures in the general structure of mental health treatment provision.  Ernest Hunter is an expert on mental health issues in native Australian and Torres Strait islanders.  He is also a professor at the University of Queensland. -END-

 

 

 

 


[Heather Warren, hrw1@geneseo.edu, 12/16]

 

 

Australian Scholarly Web Sources

 

Donovan, Robert J. and Susan Leivers

1993 Using Paid Advertising to Modify Racial Stereotype Beliefs. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 57(2): Pp. 205-218. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" href="http://www.jstor.org" class="linkification-ext">www.jstor.org, accessed December 16, 2007.

 

 

Abstract:  This document discusses whether or not advertising could help reduce racial stereotyping of Australian Aborigines and how that could work.  This is scholarly because the authors are scholars.  Donovan is an associate professor of management at the University of Western Australia and Leivers is a senior research officer at the Health Promotion Unit of the Health Dept. of Western Australia.  This is also published in a scholarly publication (don’t let the name fool you) as it is published in The Public Opinion Quarterly which is run by the American Association for Public Opinion Research which specializes in research in public opinion (is NOT a public opinion forum).  Furthermore, The authors provide source information and some mathematical statistics.  Finally, this article is relatively recent.

 

 Condon, J.R. et al.

 

2003 Cancer in Indigenous Australians:  A Review. Cancer Causes & Control, 14(2): Pp. 109-121.  JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" href="http://www.jstor.org" class="linkification-ext">www.jstor.org, accessed December 16, 2007.

 

 

 

Abstract:  This article discusses the incidents of cancer in Aborigines in comparison to the rest of the population and the possible social causes (such as poor healthcare) that could be the cause.  This article is scholarly as the authors are scholars, several of which have published many times (Google Scholar).  Furthermore, their article contains all their reference sources.  It also includes charts and diagrams from their study and research.  In addition the source is recent.  Finally, the article was published in Cancer Causes & Control, a scholarly publication.

 

 

 

McNiven, Ian J.

 

2003  Saltwater People:  Spiritscapes, Maritime Rituals and the Archaeology of Australian Indigenous Seascapes. World Archaeology, 35(3): Pp. 329-349.  JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" href="http://www.jstor.org" class="linkification-ext">www.jstor.org, accessed December 16, 2007.

 

 

Abstract:  This document discusses how the seascapes of Australia correlate with the complexity of their spiritual engagements with the sea and the use of its resources.  It gives a bit of information of the Aboriginal practice of Dreaming and how the seascape often represents part of the spirit realm.  This article is scholarly as the article is recent.  Furthermore, the author is scholarly because he has published several times (Google Scholar). Furthermore, the author provides many citations included in the document and listed at the end.  In addition, the article was published in a scholarly publication.  Also, the document includes diagrams and pictures from the sites talked about to illustrate the information presented.

 

 

 

 

-END-

 

 

 

[Adam Saunders, ars11@geneseo.edu, 12/16/07]

 

Christen, Kimberly

2006, Tracking Properness: Repackaging Culture in a Remote Australian Town. Cultural Anthropology Vol. 21, No. 3, pp. 416-446. http://www.anthrosource.net.  Accessed 12,16,2007.

 

-Annotation- This Article outlines the changing times of the Australian Aborigines in terms of tourism and the alteration to contemporary lifestyles that those in the “western world” are accustomed too.

 

Whittaker, Elvi

1994. Public Discourse on Sacredness: The Transfer of Ayers Rock to Aboriginal Ownership. American Ethnologist Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 310-334. http://www.anthrosource.net . Accessed 12,16,2007

 

-Annotation-  This articles is an overview of the passing of Ayers Rock back to the aboriginal people of Australia. The event triggered a media debate presenting discourses that created new realities around claims to sacredness, equality, restitution and human rights.

 

-END-

 

 


 

 [Lok Yung Yam, ly5@geneseo.edu, 12/17]

 

Mountford, Charles P.

1960 Phallic Objects of the Australian Aborigines. Man 60(118):81. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007

 

Abstract: This article discusses the use of phallic objects in Australian aborigine culture and the objects found in the past 40 years. It goes to say that the purpose of these objects is unclear, but it may be related to a mythical being of some sort. Regardless, the making of these phallic objects has been a part of Australian culture for a long time, and it still continues. This article is scholarly because it was published in an anthrological journal.

 

 

 

 

[Rebecca Coons, rsc2@geneseo.edu, 12/17/2007]

 

Scholarly Research (Aborigines)

 

 Majchrzak-Hamilton, Grazyna S. and Neil T. M. Hamilton

1996. Socio-economic deprivation of Australia's stolen generation in People and Place. Electronic document http://elecpress.monash.edu.au/pnp/free/pnpv5n4/hamilton.htm Accessed 15 December 2007.

 

* This article is about the stolen generations of half-caste children in Australia. It presents a survey on two groups: One of indigenous people who had been separated from their parents and one who had not been separated. In almost all cases the separated group was worse off. “On average they had left school earlier, were less likely to have educational qualifications and were less likely to be employed” (Hamilton 1996).

 

[Dan McConvey, dpm5@Geneseo.edu, 12/17/07]

 

 

Pilling, Arnold R.

1965  An Australian Aboriginal Minority: The Tiwi See Themselves as a Dominant Majority. Phylon 26 (4):305-314. JSTOR, www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007.

 

Annotation:

The Tiwi are an Aboriginal tribe in Australia.  The beginning of this article analyzes the census taken of the Aborigines in Australia.  For the sake of the census, Aborigine is constituted only by those who are full-blooded Aborigines.  The census states that the Tiwi are a minority in their region.  The latter half of this article is about the Tiwi perspective on their stance in Australia.  The Tiwi have never used the name “Aborigine” and view it as a Western manifested term that does not hold the cultural significance of the name Tiwi.  From the Tiwi standpoint they are the majority population on their native Melville and Bathurst islands.  They view these islands their cultural focal points.  The Western imposed census system is not even completely accurate because it has never been able to accurately find the exact Aboriginal tribe, so the Tiwi are not completely out of line by insisting that they a majority population in their own lands.

-END-

 

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