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Chinese Peasants - Scholarly Research in Journal Articles

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 9 months ago

Please include 3 annotated citations to scholarly journal articles focused on one of the following topics about Chinese Peasants - Economic System, Social and Economic Change, Migration to Urban Areas. All citations should be written in American Anthropologist style and placed alphabetically by author last name.

 

American Anthropologist cheat sheet


Start your citations here . . .

[Larkin Kimmerer, llk5@geneseo.edu, 11-18-07]

Zhao, Yaohui

1999 Leaving the Countryside: Rural-to-Urban Migration Decisions in China. American Economic Review 89(2), http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 18, 2007.

*This article discusses not only the movement of people from rural to urban areas, but the influx of labor their bring with them, making the Chinese movement the largest labor flow in world history. It is a scholarly article because it is published in a journal by a professor at Peking University.

 

Chan, Kam Wing and Li Zhang

1999 The Hukou System and Rural-Urban Migration in China: Processes and Changes. China Quarterly, 160, http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 18, 2007.

*The Hukou System is a system of household registration in China which works to regulate population and exercise further social control. Chan is a professor at UWashington, while Zhang is a professor of anthropology at UCDavis, so this is a scholarly article.

 

Heilig, Gerhard K.

1997 Anthropogenic Factors in Land-Use Change in China. Population and Development Review 23(1), http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 18, 2007.

*This article has a lot of land survey data, along with all of the problems associated with reporting such statistics in a large country. It also summarizes the anthropogenic factors that affect changes in this data. Heilig, according to his personal website and CV, is an economist and demographer with a lot of work on population and land use, so he seems scholarly even if he does have his own .com website!

 

END

3 Articles: Chinese Peasants

[Lanh Nguyen, ltn2@geneseo.edu, 11/19]

1. Deng, G. Kent

2000 A Critical Survey of Recent Research in Chinese Economic History. The Economic History Review 53(1), http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 19, 2007.

This article talks about how China’s economic history has changed over time. It talks about how it used to be a predominately agrarian economy until the opium trade impoverished it. It also refers to two approaches: The ‘Sinological Approach’ and the ‘comparative method’ to explain the changing economy of China. This article is scholarly because the author, Kent G. Deng specializes in the study of China, he has published many other journal articles and books on China, there have been many other books and journals that have referenced this article, and he has used many other credible sources in his article.

2. Yan, Yunxiang

1992 The Impact of Rural Reform on Economic and Social Stratification in a Chinese Village. The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs 27, http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 19, 2007.

This article talks about the inequalities and stratifications in one North Chinese village since the rural reform. It also examines the changes in economic position, political power, and social status. This article is scholarly because the author has published a few books on China according to GoogleScholar and he has published in other journals.

3. Pen, Ming-te

1996 Rural Credit in Ming-Qing Jiangnan and the Concept of Peasant Petty Commodity Production. The Journal of Asian Studies 55(1), http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 19, 2007.

This article talks about rural credit system and how it has been a hindrance to the new rural developments in the one North Chinese village. The author thoroughly explains the downfalls of the credit system: unequal relationships between creditors and debtors, high interest rates, and hinders production. This article is creditable because it is published in a journal that was written by an author who has a Ph.D and is a professor at the University of California.

 

END

 

 

 

[Dilek Canakci, dc11@geneseo.edu, 11/24]

Chinese Peasants Work Cited

Kelliher, Daniel.

1994 Chinese Communist Political Theory and the Rediscovery of the Peasantry. Modern China 20:4(387-415). Jstor Research Library, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed November 24, 2007.

This article discusses the history of Chinese peasants and the struggles that they faced since the beginning. It also discusses the recognition that they fought for and how the government continues to bash and shut them down every chance they get, even if it takes lying and violence.

Marks, B. Robert.

1977 The World Can Change!: Guangdong Peasants in Revolution. Modern China3(1): 65-100. Jstor Research Library, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed November 24, 2007.

This article discusses the history of the Chinese peasants and the struggles they faced due to their reputation in society. It also discusses the philosophers’ opinions about them and how the government has shaped their decisions after such philosophers.

Wright, C. Mary.

1951 The Chinese Peasant and Communism. Pacific Affairs 24(3): 256-265. Jstor Research Library, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed November 24, 2007.

This article discusses the importance of the Chinese peasantry and how they have been ignored for decades. It also discusses the decisions that the Communist leaders have made over the past decades and the hopes and ways of modernization.

 

 

 

[Jonathon Baker, jlb22@geneseo.edu, 11/28/07]

Chinese Peasants—Scholarly Research

Thaxton, Ralph

1977 The World Turned Downside Up. Modern China, Vol 3, No. 2. http://www.jstor.org, accessed November 28, 2007.

Social and Economic Change—This article discusses how Chinese Peasants are different from the stereotypes the West sometimes gives them. It talks about how peasant rebellions start and also it discusses three orders of meaning in the peasants traditional world.

-END-


 

[Heather Warren, hrw1@geneseo.edu, 12/2]

 

Chinese Peasants Research Articles

 

Thaxton, Ralph

1977 The World Turned Downside Up: Three Orders of Meaning in the Peasants’ Traditional Political World. Modern China 3(2):185-228. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 2, 2007.

Abstract: This article describes the hierarchy and the relationship between the peasants and the elites, referred to as a ‘patron-client’ political order. This article is scholarly because it is from a scholarly publication called Modern China (which can be found here http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal200802) which is edited by a scholar, Phillip C. C. Huang, a professor at the University of California and the founding director of the Center for Chinese Studies (biography found on website for journal). As found on Google Scholar, both Phillip C. C. Huang and the author of this particular article, Ralph Thaxton, are both scholars who have published many times. Though this particular article is somewhat old, it provides some insightful information of past studies and situations in China and would be useful for comparisons. Finally, this article was found on a reliable database called JSTOR.

 

 

Ngai, Pun

2003 Subsumption or Consumption? The Phantom of Consumer Revolution in “Globalizing” China. Cultural Anthropology 18(4):469-492. Anthrosource, http://www.anthrosource.net, accessed December 2, 2007.

Abstract: This article contrasts the experiences of laborers from the countryside with those from the urban centers. This article is scholarly because it was found on a reliable database. Furthermore, it was hosted by a reliable and scholarly publication (whose homepage can be found here http://www.ucpressjournals.com/journal.asp?j=can). In addition, the author of the article has published many other scholarly works (as found on Google Scholar). Finally, the article is recent.

 

 

Bossen, Laurel

1995 Unmaking the Chinese Peasantry: Releasing Collected Energy? Anthropology of Work Review 16(3-4):8-14. Anthrosource, http://www.anthrosource.net, accessed December 2, 2007.

Abstract: This article discusses both how the Chinese peasantry came about and how it is being dismantled by modernization. This article is scholarly since the author is a scholar who has published many times (as found on Google Scholar). Furthermore, this article is relatively recent. However, it is most useful in comparison to newer articles or if you are focusing on the 1990’s China. In addition, this article is from a scholarly publication that facilitates scholarly research (website can be found here http://www.ucpressjournals.com/journal.asp?j=awr). Finally, the article was found on Anthrosource, a reliable and scholarly database. -END-
Alfred Dilluvio ajd12@geneseo.edu 12/12/07
Thaxton, Ralph
1977 On Peasant Revolution and National Resistance: Toward a Theory of Peasant Mobilization and Revolutionary War with Special Reference to Modern China
World Politics, Vol. 30, No. 1 pp. 24-57 www.jstor.org accessed December 12, 2007
Abstract: A longstanding thesis on the Chinese revolution is that the peasants embraced the Communist movement because the brutalization by the invading Japanese Army aroused the village people, making it possible for the Communist Party to organize them and to appeal to their nationalist aspirations. A theoretical exploration of peasant mobilization and revolutionary war in the T'aihang Mountain-North China Plain revolutionary base suggests different reasons. The peasants there embraced the Communist movement mainly because the Communist Party 8th Route Army helped them regain their basic rights to subsistence in their struggles with landlords and local governments before the Japanese invasion. The armies of the Japanese and the Kuomintang exerted tremendous pressures on the peasant movements in the base area, and there was a negative correlation between the presence of these intruding forces and the emergence of a viable Communist political order. The revolutionary army won the War of Resistance and the War of Liberation largely by averting and ameliorating the burdens the peasants were encountering. In all of the revolutionary processes, the peasants placed greater value on the performance of the party in enhancing their livelihood than on the nationalist propaganda of the revolutionary movement.
Kaitlyn Northrop, krn3@geneseo.edu, 12/13
Thaxton, Ralph
1977 The World Turned Downside up: Three Orders of Meaning in the Peasants Traditional Political World. Modern China, Vol. 3, No. 2. (Apr., 1977), pp. 185-228. www.jstor.com accessed 13 December 2007
Abstract: This article talks about peasants in their traditional home places and how they have changed their roles in society from the bottom up. It talks about how te peasants are viewed from the mainstream by others. I would consider this article scholarly because it comes from a respectable journal source, and it is also written by an author who writes many other things about the chinese peasants, therefore he must be well researched and have spent time studying them.
-END-

 

 

[Steph Aquilina, sma8@geneseo.edu, 12/13]

 

Bossen, Laurel

1995 Unmaking the Chinese Peasantry–Releasing Collected Energy? Anthropology of Work Review 16(3-4), AnthroSource,

http://www.anthrosource.net, accessed December 12, 2007.

 

The Chinese peasant class comprises the agricultural sector but this term ‘peasant’ connotes a government-encouraged placement in the communist social hierarchy that is socially disregarded, politically oppressed, and economically marginalized. This article asserts that this restrictive association is being ‘unmade’, finally offering more options and more control to the peasants, improving transportation, and allowing them to operate in urban markets and occupations, to begin to accumulate earnings, and invest. As this peasantry is dissipating, the new generation is looking for more commercial occupations and the peasant status is beginning to diminish. This article is scholarly because it has an extensive list of references, is published in a scholarly journal, is associated with a University, and its author has written other scholarly works that were published in reputable journals.

END

 

Charlie Genao cg7@geneseo.edu, 12/14

 

Jennings, Glen

2006 China Along the Yellow River: Reflections on Rural Society. The China Journal 56: 161-163. Proquest Research Library, http://www.proquest.com, accessed December 14, 2007.

 

Annotation: This aritcle talks about the hardships that Chinese people in rural areas face constantly like force abortions and fines that are very high that they are force to pay because they tend to have more than one baby which violates the One child policy of China. She focuses on the relationships of the peasants and the government and corrpt pratices and economic issues. This is scholarly because of her creditials and education.

 

 

[Elen De Oliveira, emd10@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

 

Goldstein, Sidney

1990 Urbanization in China, 1982-87:Effects of Migration and Reclassification. Population and Development Review 16(4):673-701. JSTOR, www.jstor.org, accessed Dec 14, 2007.

This article goes into detail about the population change and migration into urban areas of China. There is specific mention of the Chinese peasants and their movement into urban areas where they weren't stuck with agricultural work, and the problem that this caused becuase of the entensively large population. This article is cited by five other Jstor articles and the author has written many other reputable articles as well dealing with population and urbanization. This article was published in the Population and Development Review which enhances its scholarly reputation.

 

 

[Laurie Sadofsky, las22@geneseo.edu, 12/14]

Kueh, Y.Y.

1988 Food Consumption and Peasant Incomes in the Post-Mao Era. The China Quarterly 116: 634-670. JSTOR,

http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 14, 2007.

Economic changes have been occurring since the end of Mao’s term as China’s leader. The government shifted its policies to improve the economic situation for Chinese peasants in hopes of keeping a steady agricultural supply for the massive industrial-driven population. The results of the changes to government power and focus have resulted in higher incomes and more consumption of food, both of which are very important to the survival of Chinese peasants. Their lives did not improve dramatically from these policy changes, although they were a step in the right direction.

END

 

[Jennifer Ritzenthaler, jkr5@geneseo.edu, 12/15/07]

 

Chinese Peasants:

 

Kelliher, Daniel.

1994 Chinese Communist Political Theory and the Rediscovery of the Peasantry. Modern China

20:4(387-415). Jstor Research Library, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2055/, accessed December 15,

2007.

 

Abstract: This article looks at how interest in theoretical political thought has declined since the death of Mao Zedong. The Communist Party reformers of the 1980s found it necessary to gather new information about the countryside in working out radical rural policies. However, the historical coloring of peasantry and their supposed political shortcomings corrupted this. This shows how theory has affected policy for Chinese peasants long after it was thought to have been abandoned. The article goes on to talk about the revolutionary aspect of theory and its evolution over time. This article is scholarly since the author is an associate professor of political science at the University of Minnesota. He is also the author of Peasant Power in China: The Era of Rural Reform, 1979-1989 (Yale University Press, 1992). The article also has a lengthy bibliography and was published in a journal of Communist Political Theory.

END.

 

 

 

[Anne Kim, ak13@geneseo.edu">ak13@geneseo.edu, 12/15]

 

Buxbaum, David C.

1978 A case study of the dynamics of family law and social change in rural China. Chinese Family law and social change 217- 260, 503-527. eHRAF: Collection of Ethnography, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/ehrafe/index.html, accessed

December 15, 2007.

 

Abstract: Buxbaum examines the interrelation between positive and customary family law in rural China, and shows how changes in the codified law can bring about changes in social practice. Buxbaum also describes the lives of the impoverished in rural areas.

 

END

 

[Shamiran Warda, sw11@geneseo.edu">sw11@geneseo.edu 12/15]

 

Jennings, Glen

2006 China Along the Yellow River: Reflections on Rural Society. The China Journal 56: 161-163. Proquest Research Library, http://www.proquest.com, accessed December 15, 2007.

 

Annotation: This is a great scholarly article in that it talks about the average income and relative tax burden that the peasants from the flood lands in China face. This was an interesting article in that the author also discusses how from Cao’s interviews, an ugly image was revealed where many of the Chinese peasants were forced to get abortions for they were not allowed to have many children and if they did have more children, they were required to pay large sums of money as a fine for going against what was allowed. What makes this read a scholarly source is that first it was published in the China Journal, and secondly because the author, Glen Jennings, is a well known professor who has written other various works which were also published in various journals. In addition, this article is good to use when dealing with the Chinese peasants in that it talks about them rather recently and how they living their lives today in the rural environment, in China. END

 

(Cameron Mack, cfm6@geneseo.edu">cfm6@geneseo.edu, 12/16)

 

Ngai, Pun

2003 Subsumption or Consumption: The Phantom of Consumer Revolution in "Globalizing" China. Cultural Anthropology 18(4): 469-492. Anthrosource, http://www.anthrosource.net, accessed December 15, 2007.

 

This article discusses and compares the experiences of Chinese laborers from both the countryside as well as well the rural areas. An important and interesting topic given the progress of China in certain areas, the author of this article does a fantastic job of describing the contrasting laborers in an unbiased manner. This piece is certainly scholarly, given its Ngai's achievements at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology as well as its publication in a reliable periodical and database.

 

[Dan Lilly, djl5@geneseo.edu">djl5@geneseo.edu, 12/16]

 

Skinner, G. William

1971 Chinese Peasants and the Closed Community: An Open and Shut Case. Comparitive Studies in Society and History 13

(3):270-281. JSTOR, http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0010-4175%28197107%2913%3A3%3C270%3ACPATCC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-%

23, accessed December 16, 2007.

 

Skinner's article discusses Chinese peasant society in terms of Wolf's study on closed and open societies. He purposes that this society is an example of one that is consistently both, in a constant cycle of switching between open and closed. The article is old, but still relevant, as shown by more recent citations of it, such as Chance in 1996. Skinner is a professor of anthropology at Stanford University.

 

{Isobel Connors, icc2@geneseo.edu">icc2@geneseo.edu, 12/16}

 

Chinese Peasants Scholarly Research

 

Chen, An

2007 The Failure of Organizational Control: Changing Party Power in the ChineseCountryside. Politics & Society 35(1):145-79. Academic Search Premier, http://web.ebscohost.com, accessed December 15, 2007.

Annotation: This article describes the Chinese reform regime’s loss of power over the villagers, and the villagers’ subsequent loss of authority over Chinese Peasants. Chen postulates that this failure to control the rural population is due to the “decollectivization” that China experienced after the Mao regime’s decline. This article is scholarly because it was written in a scholarly journal and was accessed through a search engine which provides solely scholarly articles.

 

 

[Brendan Ryan, bmr4@geneseo.edu">bmr4@geneseo.edu, 12/16]

 

Knight, J. et al.

2003 Chinese Peasant Choices: Migration, Rural Industry or Farming. Oxford Development Studies 31(2):123-148.

This article examines the choices that peasants living in rural areas of China are faced with when determining whether maintaining a rural lifestyle or migrating to larger cities would be more beneficial. According to recent studies, the benefit to labor ratio is better for off-farm jobs and this article talks about what this could mean for the future of agriculture in China. The article is published in a scholarly journal by two experts on the Chinese economy.

 

[Dan McConvey, dpm5@geneseo.edu">dpm5@geneseo.edu, 12/17/07]

 

 

Yang, Minchuan

1994 Reshaping Peasant Culture and Community: Rural Industrialization in a Chinese Village. Modern China 20 (2):157-179. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007.

 

 

Annotation

This journal article consists of an analysis of the process under which the Chinese peasants went during Deng Xiaoping’s decollectivization reform period. The reform restructured the Chinese peasant’s economic structure as well as created a resurgence in the traditional kin group cooperation as well as peasant individualism. The industrialization of rural China also served to diversify the economical structure creating a newly emerging cultural and social diversity. This article gives a thorough scholarly overview of effects that the industrial revolution had on the Chinese peasant population.

END

 

 

[Dan McConvey, dpm5@geneseo.edu">dpm5@geneseo.edu, 10/17/07]

 

Pilling, Arnold R.

1965 An Australian Aboriginal Minority: The Tiwi See Themselves as a Dominant Majority. Phylon: The Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture 26(4):305-314. http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007.

 

 

Annotation:

This article analyzes the Aborigines’ view of themselves in Australia. The group of interest is the Tiwi, namely those living on the Bathurst and Melville islands. The article gives a thorough report of the census reports throughout the last century and establishes that the numbers being used regard only full blooded Aborigines as Aborigines. Regardless of the census numbers declaring the Tiwi as a minority group, they still view themselves as the majority. The Tiwi do not call themselves Aborigines because this is a White-majority imposed name that categorizes all of the native people into one collective group. The Tiwi only regard themselves as the majority on their islands because they are the only places of residence where they feel connected too. This article is interesting because it is a scholarly account from the non-Western perspective on what constitutes a majority population.

END

 

 

[Adam Saunders, ars11@geneseo.edu, 12/16/07]

Roseberry, William

2004. Rent, Differentiation, and the Development of Capitalism among Peasants. American Anthropologist, Vol. 78, No. 1, pp. 45-58. http://www.anthrosource.net. Accessed, 12,16,2007

Annotation This articles gives information regarding the life of the peasant during and after the fall of communist rule. It describes their social change as well as the role that they have played and play now in society.

Dalton, George

1976. Exploitation of Peasants: A Reply to Dunn. American Anthropologist, New Series, Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 643-645. http://www.anthrosource.net" href="http://www.anthrosource.net" class="linkification-ext">http://www.anthrosource.net. Accessed, 12,16,2007

Annotation This article outlines the recent exploitation of the Chinese peasant in the recent booming market economy of China. It tells of the dictatorship of the current ruling class and the advantages they take over the peasants.

 

END

 

[Lok Yung Yam, ly5@geneseo.edu, 12/17/07]

 

 

Gray, Jack

1964 Political Aspects of the Land Reform Campaigns in China, 1947-1952. Soviet Studies 16(2): 209-231. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007

 

Abstract: This article discusses the effect of land reform on the Chinese peasants. It goes into the economic impact it had on both the peasants and China as a whole, as well as the political reasons behind reforming the system of land distribution. This is a scholarly article because it was published in a scholarly journal as well as JSTOR.

 

 

[Rebecca Coons, rsc2@geneseo.edu, 12/17/2007]

Scholarly Research (Chinese Peasants)

Mann, Susan

1984. Urbanization and Historical Change in China in Modern China. Electronic document http://www.jstor.org/view/00977004/ap010037/01a00040/0 accessed 15 December 2007.

  • This journal article talks about the urban moves in the early 1900’s in China. Peasants in rural areas began moving to cities for work and other resources but mass moving resulted in overcrowding and poor living conditions.

 

 

[Skye Naslund, sjn1@geneseo.edu, 12/17/07]

Thaxton, Ralph

1977 On Peasant Revolution and National Resistance: Toward a Theory of Peasant Mobilization and Revolutionary War with Special Reference to Modern China. World Politics 30(1): 24-57. Jstor, http://www.jstor.org, accessed December 17, 2007.

Annotation: Ralph Thaxton, a political science professor at Brandeis University, has published numerous scholarly articles on political movements among the Chinese peasants and is an expert in his field. His work has been published by numerous university presses attesting to its validity and accountability. This specific article was published in the journal, World Politics, a reputable journal published by Princeton University Press.

 

 

Hi Tom, the Aboriginies research page wont let me edit on any computer for some reason so I am posting my Abo research here. Sorry, Skye

 

[Skye Naslund, sjn1@geneseo.edu, 12/17/07]

Weiner, James F.

1999 Culture in a Sealed Envelope: The Concealment of Australian Aboriginal Heritage and Tradition in the Hindmarsh Island Bridge Affair. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 5(2): 193-210. Google Scholar, www.scholar.google.com, accessed December 17, 2007.

Annotation: James Weiner has published a number of scholarly works in the past two decades. Because this article is published in the Royal Anthropological Institute’s journal, it holds some anthropological validity. It also is fairly recent meaning that the research is modern and the some of the most recent available on the topic.

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