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Eskimo - Scholarly Research on the Web

Page history last edited by Kim Davies Hoffman 12 years, 11 months ago
 
Please include 3 annotated citations to scholarly web resources focused on one of the following topics about the Eskimo - History, Tradition and Change, Economic System, Traditional and Contemporary Education, Myths. All citations should be written in American Anthropologist style and placed alphabetically by author last name.

 

American Anthropologist cheat sheet

 


 

 

Here is an example of how we would like students to provide their information. First, include the citation of your desired material in American Anthropologist style. Second, add your annotation of the scholarly material (what is the item about? In your mind, what makes it scholarly?). An annotation does not need to be more than 2-3 sentences long, but be as complete and thorough as you would like. Third, end with your contact information (name, e-mail address, and date of post).

 

Brice-Bennett, Carol

1997 The Inuit. Electronic document, http://www.heritage.nf.ca/aboriginal/inuit.html, accessed Aug. 27, 2007.

 

This website considers prehistoric contact and modern Inuit history. This source is scholarly as it is an official Canadian heritage site and includes some citations. Through a search in Worldcat, I see that Brice-Bennett has numerous credible publications and her specialty is in the area of the Inuit of Labrador.

[K. Hoffman, kdhoffman@geneseo.edu - 8/27]

 

 

CORRECTIONS AND COMMENTS WILL BE MADE IN RED

 

REVISED CITATIONS WILL BE MADE IN BLUE

 

 

[Dave Roberts, dlr4@geneseo.edu, 9-10]

 

Dumond, Don

 

2004 A Reexamination of Eskimo-Aleut Prehistory. In American Anthropologist.

Electronic Document, http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.1987.89.1.02a00020?prevSearch=eskimo,

accessed September 10, 2007.

 

Dave, remember to indent on the lines that follow your author.  Because you have "in" within this citation, this leads readers to believe that this is a chapter IN a book.  What you have here is actually a scholarly journal article that you acquired through a library database.  You found the article in AnthroSource but the full-text of this article can actually be located in JSTOR.  EITHER WAY, THIS CANNOT BE CONSIDERED A WEBSITE FROM THE FREE WEB.  Here is how the citation should look:

 

Dumond, Don

      1987 A Reexamination of Eskimo-Aleut Prehistory. American Anthropologist 89 (1): 32-56.

      JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This website discusses the separation and synthesis of the Eskimo and Aleut languages through time.

This article is scholarly because it appeared in American Anthropologist and it has also been cited

by many scholarly resources.  Excellent annotation!

 

Damas, David

 

2004 Demographic Aspects of Central Eskimo Marriage Practices. In American Ethnologist.

Electronic Document, http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/ae.1975.2.3.02a00030?prevSearch=eskimo,

accessed September 10, 2007.

 

Same comments as above for this citation and your choice of source - not from the free web.

 

Damas, David

 

     1975 Demographic Aspects of Central Eskimo Marriage Practices. American Ethnologist 2 (3): 409-418.

     JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This website discusses how different Eskimo tribes inhabit different ecological zones and how this influences

their marriage patterns. This article is scholarly because it appeared in American Ethnologist and it has been

cited by scholarly sources.  Good!

 

Draper, H.H.

 

2004 The Aboriginal Eskimo Diet in Modern Perspective. In American Anthropologist.

Electronic Document, http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.1977.79.2.02a00070?prevSearch=eskimo,

accessed September 10, 2007.

 

Same comments as above for this citation and your choice of source - not from the free web.

 

Draper, H.H.

     1977 The Aboriginal Eskimo Diet in Modern Perspective. American Anthropologist 79 (2): 309-316.

     JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This website look back on the Aboriginal Eskimo’s limited diet and how it compares with today’s knowledge

of the need for essential nutrients and variety. This website is scholarly because it appeared in American

Anthropologist and it has been cited by many scholarly sources. 

 

Dave, these three sources are excellent and very relevant to what you're currently studying in class.  Scholarly journal articles are at the highest level of sources you would want to add to your research.  But in this case, they do not constitute free web sources.  The goal here is to practice and perfect what you can find through Google and other free web search engines.  No harm done.  Just keep this in mind for your next assignment.


 

 

{Isobel Connors, icc2@geneseo.edu, 9/11}

 

NOTE: I had trouble finding articles that were more recent than 2002, but here's what I have found so far. I will update as I find more websites.

 

1. Willis, Roy

[indent here and below] 2006 The Arctic Regions. Electronic document, http://folklore.greenwood.com/wff.jsp?k=6&bc=DBDL1311&x=FL2701&p=FL2701-1584, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

Isobel - similar to my comments to Dave above, this source comes from a database that the library subscribes to and cannot be considered a FREE web resource.  This source differs from Dave's because it does not come from a scholarly journal article.  Possibly from a book series?  I'll need to look into that further.  In the meantime, the citation for this source would look more like this:

 

Willis, Roy

     2006  The Arctic Regions. World Folklore and Folklife, http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" _fcksavedurl=">http://folklore.greenwood.com/" href="http://folklore.greenwood.com/" class="linkification-ext">http://folklore.greenwood.com/, accessed September 11, 2007.  See below . . .

 

Roy Willis' book is called World Mythology (1993) and the authors of the chapter The Arctic Region are Riches and Vitebsky (I found this out through a Worldcat search), so the citation will now look like this:

 

Riches, David and Dr. Piers Vitebsky

     1993  The Arctic Regions. In World Mythology.  Willis, Roy, ed. New York: H. Holt.  World Folklore and Folklife, http://folklore.greenwood.com/,

     accessed September 11, 2007.

 

 

Roy Willis focuses this article on Inuit spirituality and mythology and how the environment has shaped these beliefs. He makes note of the importance of the seasons in such myths, starvation being a prominent concept throughout. Willis briefly describes shamanist rituals before introducing his discussion of the Inuit spirits of the earth and sky. He points out the significance of a trinity of spirits: the sea spirit, Sedna, air spirit, Sila, and the Moon Spirit. He also mentions examples of “lesser” spiritual forces that he sees as noteworthy. Finally, he describes the Inuit adoption of Christianity and how they incorporate this religion into their mythology

 

For this course, I'd also like to see you add within your annotation the reasons you think this source is scholarly.  Who is Roy Willis?  What are his qualifications to edit a book on World Mythology?  And who are the specific authors to the chosen chapter?  They are both doctors/professors.  In what field?

 

2. Oosten, Jarich, Laugrand, Frédéric, and Cornelius Remie

[indent here and below] Summer 2006 Perceptions of Decline: Inuit Shamanism in the Canadian Arctic. Ethnohistory 53 (3): 445-477. Academic Search Premier, http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/search?vid=1&hid=108&sid=b1fa21ff-dd87-48a3-be43-f072c8ffc052%40sessionmgr108, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

Same issue as above.  This article comes from a library database.  Ethnohistory is a scholarly journal, but in this case, cannot be counted towards a FREE web resoucre.  You did an excellent job with the citation!  The only two minor things I would correct:

 

1. Indent all lines below the author line

 

2. Because we know the name of the database where you found this article + the name of the article itself, we don't need the long web address.  http://web.ebscohost.com is all you need in this citation.

 

This article emphasizes the difference between foreign and native perceptions of change on Inuit culture. The authors discuss the anthropological view that Inuit culture is fading away, contrasting this idea with how the Inuit see their culture. They reference shamanism as a main example of these differences, asserting that the Inuit carry on such tradition by incorporating them into their modern lives.   Good!  Just a few reasons why you think this journal article is scholarly, and this would be perfect.

 

END.

 

 


 

 

[Rebecca Coons, rsc2@geneseo.edu, 9/10]

 

 

 

Harcharek, Jana

 

[indent here and below] 2004 Arctic Studies Center, Electronic Document, http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/features/croads/modeskim.html, Accessed September 10, 2007.

 

 

- The second article I found was from the Arctic Studies Center and was linked to from the Smithsonian website which led me to believe it was scholarly right off the bat. It talks a bit about the history of the Yupik people and mentions the "Ice Curtain" which existed in the Bering region during the Cold War. I found this particularly interesting because most Cold War history I have learned about deals with events like the modern day witch hunts and Joe McCarthy and fails to examine the affect on the peoples who were actually geographically closest to the Soviet Union. Additionally interesting about this article is that it was written by a member of the Yupik culture, making it not only a scholarly source, but a primary source as well.   Good catch, Rebecca.  Jana Harcharek may not be considered an "expert" or a "scholar" in the field of Yupik culture (her title is Coordinator of Bilingual/Multicultural Affairs within the North Slope Borough School District - K-12) but because of her background, she is considered a primary source of information.  The fact that the Smithsonian has incorporated her experiences/comments on their website lends a lot of credibility.  Here is some more info from Harcharek - http://alaska.si.edu/culture_inupiaq.asp?subculture=Arctic%20Coast&continue=1

 

Partnow, Patricia H.

 

[indent here and below] 2006 The Greenwood Encyclopedia of World Folklore and Folklife

, Electronic Document,

http://folklore.greenwood.com/wff.jsp?k=6&x=GR2851&bc=DBFL1632&p=GR2851-1147&tab=a&id=0&u=#hit Accessed September 10, 2007.

 

- This web article talks about the mythology of the Yupik Inuit culture. According to the article, language differences account for variations between folklore. This site is scholarly as we learned in class on Thursday as it comes from the World Folklore database in the library search. I am particularly interested in mythology and was trying to find an article pertaining to a specific Inuit group. The end of the article contains the author's bibliography, and the site also has several pictures which help add to its scholarly appearance.   See comments to Isobel's post above.  Because this is a database that the library subscribes to, it cannot be considered an example of a FREE website.  In the end, this is a chapter from a book that has been published within this online database.  Here is how the citation should look:

 

Riches, David and Dr. Piers Vitebsky

     1993  The Arctic Regions. In World Mythology.  Willis, Roy, ed. New York: H. Holt.  World Folklore and Folklife, http://folklore.greenwood.com/,

     accessed September 11, 2007.

 

Smythe, Charles W.

[indent here and below] 1996 Enclyopedia of North American Indians, Electronic Document, http://www.netlibrary.com/Reader/HighlightProxy.aspx?bookid=6816&links=Yupik&filename=PAGE_183.html Accessed September 10, 2007.

 

-

 

This article is an encyclopedia article and is part of an e-book which I found by looking for a copy of the Encyclopedia of North American Indians. There are several references to Eskimo and Inuit Cultures and as it was published as part of an encyclopedia, I found the information to be accurate and scholarly. I had to create a free account in order to view the e-book. The entry covers topics from history to subsistence, and is a good starting place for more condensed or focused research to bud off of.

 

This is another one of those tricky sites.  NetLibrary is a database that the library subscribes to and this source cannot be considered a FREE website.  You are absolutely right that encyclopedia entries are great starting places that can provide key terms, places, and authors to enhance a more scholarly search.  Within your citation, it would be helpful for you to list the title of the entry and then the title of the source (same with your second source citation from World Folklore).  Unfortunately the link didn't take me to the exact page for the Yupik.

----------------------

 

 

 

[Jonathon Baker, jlb22@geneseo.edu, 9/11]

 

Eskimo Scholarly Research

 

Alaskool Organization

[indent here and below] 1998-2004 History of Native Alaska Education. Electronic Document. http://www.alaskool.org/native_ed/native_ed_intro.htm, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

-This website contains links to information on how education has changed and how it has remained unchanged for Native Alaskans over the past century or so. The source may be trusted as scholarly because it is a training resource for teachers in Alaska and has been put together by a team of teachers and native elders, who provide must of the information firsthand.

 

What a great site!  Chock full of very valuable and first hand information.  Good find.

 

 

 

Virtual Museum of Canada

[indent here and below] 2002 Games of the Arctic. Electronic Document. http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Traditions/English/inuit_games.html, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

-This website contains information and pictures describing traditional games that were played by the Inuit. The source is scholoarly because it is from the Virtual Museum of Canada, whose information, pictures, and articles are complied from museums and government agencies throughout Canada.

 

Interesting stuff!  And yes, because the info comes from a museum site, it can be trusted.  Even better, because the topic is the Inuit, this info comes from a Canadian museum.

 

 

 

Canadian Museum of Civilization

[indent here and below] 2003 SANATUJUT: PRIDE IN WOMEN'S WORK Copper and Caribou Inuit Clothing Traditions. Electronic Document.

http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

 

-This website contains information about clothing traditions and materials in Inuit culture. The source is scholarly as it is the website of the Canadian National Museum of Civilization. It contains several pages with good pictures showing eskimo clothing: contemporary, traditional, and dance.

 

Good.  Very interesting.  Great pictures too!

 


 

Eskimo Scholarly Research

 

 

Chausonnet, Valerie and Ann Fienup-Riordan

[indent here and below] 2004 Tattoo Magic. Electronic document, http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/features/croads/ekven9.html, accessed

September 10, 2007.

 

This site discusses the practice of face tattooing in the Inuit culture. The source is scholarly because Fienup-Riordan is an author of many scholarly books on the Eskimo (as found on Google Scholar). Excellent!  Also, this article was written for use by the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and the Arctic Studies Center. The source is also relatively recent and appears to have been edited to retain accuracy.  Great annotation and a very interesting site.

 

Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar

[indent here and below] 1999 Yupiaq Education Revisited. Electronic document, http://arcticcircle.uconn.edu/HistoryCulture/kawagley.html,

accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This site talks about the Yupiaq culture and how they view and learn about their world through stories and cultural practices. This is a scholarly article since it was written by a scholarly writer (checked on Google Scholar) who is also a professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This article is presented by Arctic Circle which was created by various archaeologists and anthropologists, such as Norman Chance, who are “interested in finding ways to expand knowledge of the Circumpolar North to a wider audience of students, educators, policy makers, environmental planners, and others” ( See About Arctic Circle link on page ). This site is also still being maintained.  Excellent work here.  I see that the information on this site was also published in the Journal of American Indian Education, [Vol 39, #1] in the fall of 1999, which is a free journal on the web - something that you can look into further for scholarly articles.

 

Morrison, David

[indent here and below] 2004 The Inuvialuit of the Western Arctic. Electronic Document, http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/inuvial/indexe.html,

accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This site has several sections on the land and Inuit people of the western Canadian Arctic who call themselves the Inuvialuit. This site is scholarly because it was written by Dr. David Morrison who has various scholarly publications (as found on Google Scholar). The author also provides an email to contact him in the event of questions. The site has been updated since its original creation and is part of the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation. Finally, the researcher/author also provides biographical information about himself and his research.  Great!

 

END

[Heather Warren, hrw1@geneseo.edu, 9/11]

 


 

 

 

Eskimo Scholarly Research on the Web start:

 

Aisaican, Richard

[indent here and below] 2001 Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education, A Priority For Aboriginal Women of Canada. Electronic document, http://web.mala.bc.ca/firstnations/richard.pdf, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

-This article is about the existence of Aboriginal people in Canada in post-secondary institutions. It researches the barriers that are placed between themselves and these institutions, both financial and social. It is a long essay with good citations at the end.  What about the author's credentials?  Look here to see who Richard Aisaican is and what he has become since writing his undergraduate paper that you cite here: http://www.mala.ca/alumni/newsletter/2006/Fall/AlumniProfiles.asp.  Would you consider one of your classmate's paper to be "scholarly"?  Aisaican definitely includes a lengthy bibliography and as a member of the aboriginal population, he serves as a primary source of information.

 

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

[indent here and below] 2004 Backgrounder on Inuit and Education For Discussion at Life Long Learning Sectoral Meetings. Electronic document, http://www.itk.ca/roundtable/sectoral-lifelearning-backgrounder.php, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

-This article is about the assimilation strategy used for educating those in aboriginal cultures and the damage that has been done by instituting these policies. It discusses new and positive innovations that can be used to educate those in Inuit society. It is long with helpful links to other webpages.  Why do you consider this to be scholarly?  The fact that the information comes from an Inuit organization makes it primary documentation, but beware of bias.  Since the information only comes from one point of view, albeit the point of view from those living the experiences they discuss, try to find other articles from other sources that back up this information and balance the opinions stated.

 

Kenny, Carolyn

[indent here and below] 2002 North American Indian, Metis and Inuit Women Speak about Culture, Education and Work. Electronic document, http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/pubs/pubspr/0662318978/200203_0662318978_e.pdf, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

-This article contains the work of three researchers who conducted focus groups and interviews with over a hundred Aboriginal women across Canada to study the barriers created by policies which do not support Aboriginal women to maintain full cultural lives and pursue contemporary education and work. This study includes Inuit women. The essay is long with good citations. It is separated by topic.  What about the credentials of the authors/researchers?  This is an amazing find!!!!  No other student in this class has ever found this.  Great job!

 

[Jennifer Ritzenthaler, jkr5@geneseo.edu, 9/12]

 

 

 


 

Eskimo Scholarly Research

 

 

Boudle, Evelyne, Wright, Stephen C., and Taylor, Donald M.

[indent here and below] 2003 Early Heritage-language Education and the Abrupt Shift to a Dominant-language Classroom: Impact on the Personal and Collective Esteem of Inuit Children in Arctic Quebec. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism Vol. 6 No. (5), http://www.channelviewpublications.net/beb/006/0349/beb0060349.pdf, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

 

This article focused on language education for Inuit children. It discusses issues relating to self-esteem (individually and collectively) as a function of native language instruction and pro-White attitudes in bilingual submersion.  Why do you feel this is scholarly? It definitely is, but we want to hear why you think so.  You have done a great job finding free scholarly journal articles on the web - with this site and those below.  Did you search anything specifically on Google to find these?

 

 

Condon, Richard G., Collings, Peter, and Wenzel, George

[indent here and below] 1995 The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnicity, and Economic Adaptation among Young Adult Inuit Males. Arctic 48 (1), Journal March 1995, http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic48-1-31.pdf, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

This paper explored growing tensions between traditional culture and modernity that are emerging in Inuit society, as per the general decrease in subsistence hunting and fishing. The motivations and implications for why many young adults are still interested in pursuing this lifestyle despite the fact that their society is significantly different than that of their parents, is discussed in detail.

 

 

Furgal, Christopher, and Seguin, Jacinthe

[indent here and below] 2006 Climate Change, Health, and Vulnerability in Canadian Northern Aboriginal Communities. Environmental Health Perspectives 114 (12) Dec 2006, http://www.ehponline.org/members/2006/8433/8433.html, accessed September 11, 2007.

 

This paper relates current climate change to the environment in which indigenous arctic populations live. Studies in Inuit communities have clearly shown negative effects on the health and vulnerability of these people, requiring a collaborate effort to respond sufficiently to the impact of climate change in local areas. END  Great finds.  Free access to scholarly journal articles that are directly related to your topic.  You couldn't ask for better results!

 

 

[Stephanie Aquilina sma8@geneseo.edu 9/12]

 

 

 

 

[Kaitlyn Northrop, krn3@geneseo.edu, 9/10]
 
Condon, Richard; Collings, Peter; Wenzel, George
25 Oct 1994. The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnicity and Economic Adaptation among young Inuit males. Electronic Document. http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic48-1-31.pdf Accessed 10 Sept 2007
 
 
This is the perfect case of a free internet source that is also a journal article.  The citation will vary slightly.
 
Condon, Richard; Collings, Peter; Wenzel, George
1995 The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnicity and Economic Adaptation among young Inuit males. Arctic 48 (1): 31-46, http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic48-1-31.pdf, accessed 10 Sept 2007.
 
This article talks about the economic adaptations and changes that have occurred through generations of hunters. It also talks about the motivations for certain hunting and gathering practices. The article would be considered scholarly because it is a story with actual input from the Inuit people and thus is the factual account of what really happened and how the changes occurred. It has also been cited in many other papersGreat observation.  On the first page of the article, at the very bottom, you can also find what universities these professors are affiliated with.
 
 
Grygier, Pat Sandiford
 
This article book talks about the tuberculosis epidemic among the Inuit people in the mid-century.
 
This article would be considered scholarly because it is a published work that contains many facts and statistics about the epidemic. This shows that research was actually done and the results are scholarly.  Also, look to see what the author's credentials are. This is a great find but keep in mind that Google does not have the right to provide the ENTIRE book in free full-text format, so it might be better to locate a physical copy of this book through Worldcat.  Notice that I have revised your citation to include the fact that you have only found excerpts from this book.  You would do the same thing if you could only find an abstract or summary for a journal article.
 
 
McGhee, Robert
 
This article talks about the people of the Arctic and their migration to the places they are today. It discusses the hardships they faced due to environmental change as well as the artifacts and archaeological evidence they left behind.
 
This would also be considered scholarly because it is a real life account of what the researcher found when he was exploring the Arctic people. It tells of what they left behind and what this would have meant to them based on the context in which it was found.  Good . . . see comments from your second citation.
 
-END-
 
Eskimo- Scholarly Research

1)This website traces the development of an IÑupiat Eskimo labor force in the western Arctic commercial whaling industry in the late-19th and early-20th centuries (wage labor). This website is scholarly because it was found in Abstracts in Anthropology and has been sited by scholarly sources.  

 

Cassel, M.S.

2005 The Landscape of IÑupiat Eskimo Industrial labor.  Abstracts in Anthropology 39(3): 132-151. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2796/app/home/abstract.asp?referrer=parent&backto=searchabstractsresults,1,16, accessed September14, 2007.

 

A few things with this . . . Abstracts in Anthropology is a database that the library subscribes to so this source cannot be considered a FREE web resource.  It is definitely a scholarly database though.  Because the source is a journal article, your citation would be different than what you have here.  Finally, because you are only finding the abstract to this article, and not the entire article, you would need to add this fact to your citation.

 

Cassel, M.S.

2005  Abstract of The Landscape of Inupiat Eskimo Industrial Labor.  Historical Archaeology 39 (3): 132-151. Abstracts in Anthropology, http://anthropology.metapress.com, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

2) This website discusses the distribution of Eskimos depending on region, along with how they utilize their environment to help sustain their cultures. This website is scholarly because it’s from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (A scholarly source in itself).

 

 Fitzhugh, W. William

 

2004 Eskimo Dancer. Electronic document, http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/features/croads/eskimo.html, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

Besides the fact that this site is part of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History (definitely a mark of credibility), we can find Fitzhugh's credentials: http://www.mnh.si.edu/ARCTIC/html/about_fitzhugh.html  Good find and a perfect citation!

 

 

 

3) This website investigates and translates Eskimo/Inuit languages from various regions of the world. This website is scholarly because it has contact information (one of the contact includes a Cherokee man who has done work in linguistic preservation with many Indian languages of Oklahoma- Orrin Lewis) , the editor of the website specializes in language studies with the Eskimo/Inuit (through Google scholar on Laura Redish, I found a few other works by her that were credible), and this site is a non profit website dedicated to the survival of Native American languages.  All excellent reasons!  Good background checks and a really interesting site.

 

Redish, Laura                                                                                                                                                                                    

2007 Eskimo-Aleut Language Family. Electronic document, http://www.nativelanguages.org/famesk.htm, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

 

 

[Lanh Nguyen, ltn2@geneseo.edu, 9/14]

 

END

 

 
 
Eskimo Scholarly Research:
 
 
Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation
2001 Canadian Inuit History: A Thousand-Year Odyssey. Electronic document,
 
This website is broken down into short but very useful sections. The sections go from who the Inuit people are, to where they originated from, how their live their everyday life, to eventually what is stored for them in the future.  What makes this a scholarly site is the fact that it is very organized. In addition to the organizational aspect of this site, there are small pictures beside each section that one can click on to learn more about these people. At the end of the article there is also a little icon that entitled “further readings” and when one clicks on it, one gets a glossary as well as a list of other sources to check out. Its publication and organization being an Canadian Museum shows it’s a reliable site.
 
 
Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar
 
1999 Yupiaq Education Revisited. Electronic document,
 
This website is also broken into various components to better help the reader understand more about the Yupiaq people and their way of life and more importantly their belief systems, such as in the Ellam Yua, or Creative Force. In addition to such, this article goes into greater depth on their lifestyle which was very interesting as I was reading a little about it. In all, what makes this website a scholarly article is the author itself; Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley is known to be a professor at University of Alaska Fairbanks. In addition to the author being a scholarly writer, the “Arctic Circle” main page looks very professional and reliable therefore receiving numerous awards, with over 2 million viewers thus far.  Adding more to this website is the fact that it is being maintained and updated every so often.  In addition, other writers for this website are known to be archaeologists and anthropologists, such as Norman Chance, who apparently is a much respected man.
 
 
Condon, Richard G., Collings, Peter, and Wenzel, George
1994 The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnicity and Economic Adaptation among Young Inuit
Males. Electronic Document. http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic48-1-31.pdf, accessed September 13,
2007.
 
This website is more concern with the hunting aspects of the Inuit people. The three authors write about the economic adaptations and hunting ways from the Inuit community of Holman, whom are between the ages of 20 and 35. This article goes on talking about various changes that have occurred through the generations of hunters and the main motivations for hunting and gathering practices especially in this age group. What makes this website a scholarly page is because, like the many other websites, it is broken down into various sections. For instance, there is an “Introduction” section than a section all about the “Research Methods” and one on “Ethnographic background to Holman Harvesting” and so on and forth. This adds to the website for it makes it more organized. In addition to how it’s broken down, this website contains many helpful tables and graphs that show helpful data results; for example table one indicates the employment profile of sample households. Lastly, the last couple  pages give a list of references which one can check out to learn more about this topic. The acknowledgement section also tells us more about this website: it was made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation, Division of Polar Programs.  
[Shamiran Warda, sw11@geneseo.edu] 9/15
[Elen De Oliveira, emd10@geneseo.edu, 9/16] 
 Note: thats the only way I could get the indent to work on my computer

Graburn, Nelson

1998 Weirs in the River of Time: The Development of Historical Conciousness among canadian Inuit. Electronic document, http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/mua.1998.22.1.18, accessed September 16, 2007.

 

This webpage goes into depth about Inuit culture, tradtion and change, especially the Canadian Inuit.  It relates to the museum and all of the efforts being made to save and record Inuit culture.  It is complete with pictures and diagrams to better represent the culture.  It is a scholarly article becuase all of the many references are listed and there is even a background given on the author who is a professor of anthropology and curator of Ethnology at the hearst museum at the University of California, Berkley, another good indication of the credibility of this article.

 

Spada, Nina, and Patsy Nightbown 

2002 L1 and L2 in the education of Inuit children in Northern Quebec: Abilities and Perceptions. Electronic document, www.multilingualmatters.net/le/016/0212/le0160212.pdf,  accessed September 16, 2007.

 

This article discusses Inuit education in depth and goes into the general discussion of whether or not it is right to require learning of students in their second language. This is a language that they might not be altogether very familiar with yet. They speak of Inuit educational history and how they educate their children differently than others do. They also spoke about the fact that Inuit children are brought away from their native, first language and taught in their second language at a very young age. This seems to be a reliable and scholarly webpage because it is clear that a lot of research and effort was put into it and all of its many sources are listed towards the end of the reading. They also explain where all of their information came from, if not from the articles listed, and that was interviews of teachers and students themselves. The webpage is not very recent, dated in 2002, but the information is not that which would be outdated. The issue of teaching in a students second language is still an issue today with ESL students among others.

 


Eskimo Scholarly Research
 

Johnston, F. Thomas

 

            1979 The Social Background of Eskimo Music in Northwest Alaska. The Journal of American Folklore 89:438-448. Jstor Library,       

             http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0021-8715%28197610%2F12%2989%3A354%3C438%3ATSBOEM%3E2.0.CO%3B   2-N, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

 

This article discussed the importance of music among the areas of Alaska, Greenland and Canada.  It talks about how each culture impacts the orientation of different kinds of music and how their instruments were invented and how culture has great effect on their instruments. This article also provides pictures of people dancing in their traditional clothing during their ceremonies.

 

 

 

 

Laguna, De Frederica.

 

            1946 The Prehistory of Kodiak and the Aleutian Islands. Pacific Affairs 19:202-204. Jstor Research Library,

            http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0030-851X%28194606%2919%3A2%3C202%3ATPOKAT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Y, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

This article is very well written and talks about the cultural differences among the Eskimo groups.  It also talks about geography of the Eskimo tribes and the language variation among the different parts of Northern Alaska, Canada and Greenland. It also provides great information on archaeological research that has been done on the Gulf of Alaska area and the difference of race and their Eskimo traits.

 

 

 

 

Mathiassen, Therkel.

 

            1930 The Question of the Origin of Eskimo Culture. American Anthropologist   32:591-607. Jstor Library,

            http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-7294%28193010%2F12%292%3A32%3A4%3C591%3ATQOTOO%3E2.0.CO% 3B2-5, accessed September 14, 2007.

 

This article clearly discusses the origin of the Eskimo culture.  It explores different kinds of theories that were being considered historically.  Most importantly, this article talks about the migration and settlement patterns of the Eskimo and how their culture arose from that point on.

 

[Dilek Canakci, dc11@geneseo.edu, 9/17]

 

 

  
[Dan McConvey, dpm5@geneseo.edu, 9-19]
 
Morrison, David. “Canadian Inuit History: A Thousand-Year Odyssey.” The Canadian Museum of Civilization and Canadian War Museum. 2001. Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation. 10 Sept. 2007 <http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html>.
 
            This website gives a general history of the Canadian Inuit. There is an aim to show the origins of the Inuit and how their culture has been resilient through time. It explores how contact with the Vikings and Explorers. As a result of the introduction of democracy to the Arctic the Canadian Inuit have officially claimed their land and established the territory of Nunavut.
 
“Research: Research Profile.” The Arctic Studies Center.  2004. Smithsonian: National Museum of Natural History. 10 Sept. 2007 <http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" href="http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples" class="linkification-ext">http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/research.html#peoples>.
 
The Arctic Studies Center works with several aspects of the circumpolar region. This website consists mainly of anthropological research.   It is broken up into four research parts including: the History of Northern Peoples and Environments, Culture Contact and Transformations, Collections, and Collaboration and Partnerships. The website also includes information about other research projects involving the Northern Peoples.
 
“Yup’ik and Cup’ik” http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.alaskanative.net" href="http://www.alaskanative.net" class="linkification-ext">www.alaskanative.net. 2000. Alaska Native Heritage Center. 10 Sept. 2007 < http://www.alaskanative.net/35.asp >.
 
This website involves the Yup’ik and the Cup’ik people of Alaska. It discusses the different roles of males and females within the villages along with the different tools that are used based on gender. The females and children live in a building apart from the males. The Religion includes Shamanism, which has both good and evil Shamans. The Yup’ik and the Cup’ik have an interconnected trade system, especially between coastal villages and inland villages.
 
 -END-
 
 
Damas, David
          1972 Central Eskimo Systmes of Food Sharing.  Ethnology 11 (3): 220-240.
          JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" href="http://www.jstor.org" class="linkification-ext">http://www.jstor.org, accessed September 30, 2007.
 
This article discusses in-depth the food sharing practices of the Eskimo, a topic which the author feels is under-discussed by the anthropological community.  It is focused mainly on the differences and similarities of three tribes: the Copper, Netsilik, and Igluik.  According to Damas there have been several ethnographies that discuss the different food sharing practices of the Eskimo but none that are comprehensive and with a direct focus on that aspect of their culture.
 
Parker, Seymour
          1962 Eskimo Psychopathology in the Context of Eskimo Personality and Culture.  American Anthropologist 64(1): 76-96
          JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed September 30, 2007.
 
This article discusses the incidence of mental illness within the eskimo culture and attempts to explain the relationship between the two.  How cultural beliefs, social organization and personality development contribute to mental illness and determine how it is viewed within the larger cultural group is where the main focus of this article lies.
-END-
 
[Brendan Ryan, bmr4@geneseo.edu, 9/30]
 
 
 
 
 
[Larkin Kimmerer, llk5@geneseo.edu, 9/30] 

Boas, Franz

 

1894 “Notes on the Eskimo of Port Clarence, Alaska.” Journal of American Folklore 7. Electronic document, http://folklore.greenwood.com/wff.jsp?k=6&x=GR0000&bc=DBFL1632&p=GR0000-10270&tab=ft&id=0&u=#hit, accessed September 30, 2007.

This is a myth about the sun from the Eskimo. The sun was missing, and so they set out on a lengthy journey across the tundra without the sun to find the sun from a young woman. On their journey they met many obstacles, but they eventually reached the woman who had the sun and the moon. Her mother told her to give them the moon, but she disobeyed and gave them the sun, which gives warmth and light, but the moon  just gives light. I’m not positive this counts as an electronic resource because it actually appeared in a journal, but I thought it was a good source.

 

 

Ziker, John.

 

2002 The Food Sharing Debate: A Case Study from Siberia. Draft paper prepared for the 9th International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies, Edinburgh, Scotland. Electronic Document,  http://www.eth.mpg.de/dynamic-index.html?http://www.eth.mpg.de/people/ziker/food-sharing-02.html, accessed September 30, 2007

 

 

This article from the Max Planck Institute discusses the food sharing of Siberian Eskimos with regard to kinship, reciprocity, and producers/seekers.  He argues that food sharing is based upon these models, especially food sharing among kin groups. Food sharing at meals is the focus of the kinship studies, while reciprocity following a hunt is important in regards to the reciprocal aspect of food sharing.

 

 

Wenzel, George

 

The Harp-seal controversy and the inuit economy. Electronic document, http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic31-1-2.pdf, accessed September 30, 2007

 

 

This article discusses the effect that activists are having on the inuit economy. Activists against the hunting of harp and ringed seals have disrupted the economic and cultural connection between the inuit and the seal populations. The article is about the disruptions that the controversy has caused in the inuit Economy, which is based largely on seal hunting.

 

(Cameron Mack, cfm6@geneseo.edu, 10/10)

 

Eskimo Scholarly Articles

 

Alaskool Organization

1998-2004 History of Native Alaska Education. Electronic Document. http://www.alaskool.org/native_ed/native_ed_intro.htm, accessed October 10, 2007.

It is clear that this site was put together by teachers and others involved in education.  There are many links on the site that lead to what can be considered scholarly articles. The authors are all professionals who are versed in their subjects and who provide the readers with first-hand information concerning how education has remained the same for Eskimos (Native Alaskans) for roughly 100+ years. This website had many informative articles.

 

Canadian Museum of Civilization

2003 Sanatujut: Pride in Women’s Work Copper And Caribou Inuit Clothing Traditions. Electronic Document. http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" href="http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html" class="linkification-ext">hhtp://www.civilization.ca/aborig/threads/thred02e.html, accessed October 10, 2007.

This website is sponsored by a museum (Canadian Museum of Civilization), immediately making it at least seem scholarly. The contents of the site include information about clothing traditions and materials from Inuit culture. The site also includes many interesting and unique images.

 

Damas, David

1975 Demographic Aspects of Central Eskimo Marriage Practices. American Ethnologist 2 (3): 409-418. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 10, 2007.

The author of this article taught at McMaster University, making it an initially credible source.  This article takes an in depth look at marriage practices of Eskimos. Many interesting points are brought up within the text and much can be learned about the Eskimo’s marital situations through reading the article.

 

 

[Skye Naslund, sjn1@geneseo.edu, 10-4-07]

 

 

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development of Canada

 

                    2004  Inuit Information Sheet.  Electronic document,

 

                    http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/pr/info /info114_e.html, accessed October 2,

 

                    2007.

 

 

Abstract:  This website provides a good overview of the history of the relationship between the Canadian government and the Inuit.  While it is biased toward the Canadians as it is a government site, it does a good job explaining interaction with the natives as a whole.

 

 

Mitchell, Marybelle

 

                    2007  Inuit Co-operatives:  The Canadian Encyclopedia.  Electronic document,

 

                    http://thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004042,

 

                    accessed October 2, 2007.

 

 

Abstract:  This site talks about the economy of Inuit society.  The site specifically addresses the Inuit co-operative system established in the late 1950s as an economic security net for the Inuit people.

 

 

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

 

2007  Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami:  National Inuit Organization of Canada.  Electronic document, http://www.itk.ca/, accessed October 4, 2007.

 

 

Abstract:  This site offers many links concerning the history of the Inuit, their current views on different political issues, their health department and many other aspects of their culture.  This site helps us gain insite into how the Inuit of today view themselves. 

 

 

-END-

 

 

[Laurie Sadofsky, las22@geneseo.edu, 10/13]

 

Three Web Sites

 

 

Knud Rasmussen

            1921 Eskimo Folk Tales. W Worster, trans. And ed. Electronic document, http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/inu/eft/index.htm, accessed  

            October 11, 2007.                                                                                                            

            This website includes over thirty myths and poems of the Eskimos collected by Rasmussen during his travels in Greenland. Rasmussen was a Danish explorer who was part Eskimo and spent years of his life on expeditions around Greenland.  These myths were told to him by Eskimo storytellers.  Worster is an English translator who is associated with numerous materials on the Eskimo, often written by Rasmussen.

 

Northwestern University Digital Library Collection

2004 Edward S. Curtis’s The North American Indian. Electronic document, http://curtis.library.northwestern.edu/curtis/toc.cgi, accessed October 13, 2007.

 

            This site includes Volumes I through XX of Curtis’ North American Indian collection.  All of the photographs he took for each volume as well as his plates to supplement each volume.  Along with the photographs are his in-depth observations and understanding of each tribe he wrote about.  It is an extremely impressive work.  Curtis was a photographer and scholar on the the Native Americans and this work is proof of it.

 

Virtual Museum of Canada

2002 Living Traditions Museums Honour the North American Indigenous Games: Inuit Games. Electronic document, http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Traditions/English/inuit_games.html, accessed October 13, 2007.

           

           This website is from the Virtual Museum of Canada and includes pages and pages of information on Inuit games.  There are also photographs to accompany the written information and the sources of these photographs are museums and other scholarly collections.  The site combines many aspects of Canadian heritage and can even be used by teachers in the classroom.

 

-END-

 

[Dan Lilly, djl5@geneseo.edu, 10/14]

Eskimo references

 

Kaplan, Lawrence. Inuit or Eskimo? 7 June 2002. 10 September 2007 <http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" href="http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html" class="linkification-ext">http://www.uaf.edu/anic.inuitoreskimo.html>.

 

    This brief site discusses the difference between the words "eskimo" and "inuit." Though linguists now believe that "eskimo" refers to snow shoes instead of consuming raw meat, the natives of Alaska still seem to prefer the term "inuit," which simply means, "people."

 

Morrison, David. Canadian Inuit History. 27 September 2001. 10 September 2007 <http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html" href="http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html" class="linkification-ext">http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html>.

 

    This source, which comes from the Canadian Museum of Civilization, discusses many aspects of both the origins and modernization of the Inuit people. It chronicles their beginnings in northwester Alaska, their movement to the east, then contact with explorers which brought about cultural diffusion of both a benificial and detrimental nature. The economy and disease saw an increase at this time. It then discusses Inuit forms of government, and possible paths the Inuit will take in the future.

 

Platt, Diane. The Inuit Family. 2007. 10 September 2007 <http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html" href="http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html" class="linkification-ext">http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1991/2/91.02.07.x.html>.

 

    This website stresses the importance of the family unit in Inuit society in virtually all aspects of life. Hunting, in particular whaling, for instance, requires the cooperative efforts of the entire family. It also discusses Inuit spiritual beliefs and the impact of those beliefs on Inuit society as well as the surrounding environment.

 

-end-

 

[Nicole Rothman, ngr1@geneseo.edu, 10/21]

Northwestern University Digital Library Collection

     2004 Edward S. Curtis’s The North American Indian. Electronic document,          

     http://curtis.library.northwestern.edu/curtis/toc.cgi, accessed October 21, 2007

This site is from Northwestern University and provides a collection of Edward Curtis’s research on Eskimo. There are volumes of his written research along with photographs.

 

Virtual Museum Canada

     2006 Inuit History, Art and Other Traditions of the Inuit. Electronic Document,                                                                                                        http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/English/Teacher/inuit_history.html, accessed           

     October 21, 2007

This site contains information on Inuit history, art, games and other cultural aspects.

 

Fitzhugh, William W.

     2004 Arctic Studies Center. Electronic Document,                               

     http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/features/croads/eskimo.html#eskimo, accessed          

     October 21, 2007

This site has information on Eskimo culture, mainly environment and locations of different groups and similarities between those groups.

END

 

 

 

 

ESKIMO

 

[Anne Kim, ak13@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

 

Condon, Richard G.

Inuit behavior and seasonal change in the Canadian Arctic, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=ND08-034;owc=ND08, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

                This website discusses the behavior and seasonal change of the Eskimos. Condon illustrates the relationship between seasonal rhythms and human behavior. He also researches the historical background and the physical environment of the Inuits.

 

Jenness, Diamond

Myths and traditions from northern Alaska, the Mackenzie Delta, and Coronation Gulf, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=ND08-005;owc=ND08, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This work contains thirteen texts of Inuit folk and tales with English translations. The other part of this work contains English versions of eighty-one myths and folktales.

 

Usher, Peter J.

Economic basis and resource use of the Coppermine-Holman region, N.W.T., http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=ND08-036;owc=ND08, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

 This is an ethnographic survey of two Copper Inuit communities in the Northwest Territories of Canada. This piece is focused from the 1950s to the mid 1960s. Major topics discussed are geography, the historical background of the region, population, etc.

 

END

 

[Adam Saunders, ars11@geneseo.edu, 10/22/07]

 

 

Morrison, David.

2001. “Canadian Inuit History: A Thousand-Year Odyssey.” The Canadian Museum of Civilization and Canadian War Museum.  Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation. http://www.civilization.ca/educat/oracle/modules/dmorrison/page01_e.html.  Accessed Oct. 22, 2007.

-This page gives a basic overview o the Inuit people. A lot of it goes over the Inuit and its encounters with outside cultures. Such cultures as the Vikings and modern explorers are two such factions that this site encompasses. Side links lead to various other areas of the site that gives information on that specific topic. Along with a few pictures that can be enlarged by clicking on them this site is pretty straight forward and basic. Mainly a tool to get an overview of the culture and its connection with other peoples.

 

Alaskool Organization

1998-2004 History of Native Alaska Education. Electronic Document. http://www.alaskool.org/native_ed/native_ed_intro.htm, Accessed Oct 22, 2007.

-The Alaskool website is a site devoted to the history of Inuit education. This is a topic not covered very often by other sources and is an interesting look at the evolution of the education of the Inuit people. The site provides much material in which you can access as well as examples of the education materials in which they use.

 

-END-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Lok Yung Yam, ly5@geneseo.edu, 10/22/07]

 

 

 

Borré, Kristen

 

1991 Seal Blood, Inuit Blood, and Diet: A Biocultural Model of Physiology and Cultural Identity. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 5 (1):48-62. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This article discusses the importance of hunting to the Inuit, with the seal as its main focus. It also talks about how hunting affects the Inuit diet and how this in turn affects Inuit culture. It is scholarly because it was published in an anthropological journal and was screened by JSTOR.

 

 

Thalbitzer, William

 

1950 A Note on the Derivation of the Word "Eskimo" (Inuit). American Anthropologist 52 (4):564. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This article discusses the origins of the word Eskimo and why it is not accepted by the Inuit. It is scholarly because it was published in an anthropological journal and was screened by JSTOR. There is also a reliable reference cited.

 

 

Barger, W.K.

 

1977 Culture Change and Psychosocial Adjustment. American Ethnologist 4 (3): 471-495. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This article discusses the assimilation of the Inuit into Western society. It talks about the difficulties as well as the reasons the Inuit were successful. It is scholarly because it appears in both an anthropological journal and JSTOR.

 

 

 

Alfred Dilluvio ajd12@geneseo.edu 10/22
Alaskool Organization
1998-2004 History of Native Alaska Education. Electronic Document. http://www.alaskool.org/native_ed/native_ed_intro.htm, accessed October 21, 2007.
This web based scholarly website is scholarly because it was compiled by a group of teachers and information is provided by actual Inuit in the community. The information can be trusted because it is often compiled by teachers who obtain their information from Inuit themselves.

Morrison, David

 

2004 The Inuvialuit of the Western Arctic. Electronic Document, http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/inuvial/indexe.html,accessed September 10, 2007.

 

This web based scholarly website appears to be scholarly because of the important “about the researcher” section which was included on the sidebar of the page. It said that Dr. David Morrison has a Ph.D in Archaeology from the University of Toronto, and is curator of Northwest Territories Archaeology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. The author of many books and scientific papers on Inuit culture and history, he is a veteran of over twenty years of Arctic field work. His qualifications alone indicate to me that it is a scholarly website.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

Self-Image, World-Image: Speculations on Identity from Experiences with Inuit

 

Arlene Stairs Ethos> Vol. 20, No. 1 (Mar., 1992), pp. 116-126

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0091-2131%28199203%2920%3A1%3C116%3ASWSOIF%3E2.0.CO%3B2-E 

This article is scholarly because the author has written many other things which pertain to the Inuit. I looked her up on google scholar and i found a wealth of information related to the Inuit.

 [Geni Beninati, gb3@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

SCHOLARLY RESEARCH

Fitzhugh, William

        2004 Eskimo- Artic Studies Center. Electronic Document, http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/features/croads/eskimo.html, October 22, 2007.

This website is from the Smithsonian, a very well known museum that concentrates on anthropology.  There is a specific center about Artic Studies, that includes Eskimo.

 

Redish, Laura  

        2007 Native Languages of the Americas. Electronic Document, http://www.native-languages.org/inuktitut.htm , October 22, 2007.

This website is created by a woman with a PhD in linguistics. It provides many links to help the understanding of inukitut.

 

-END-

 

Charlie Genao cg7@geneseo.edu 10/22/07 
Inuit: 1. Morantz, Toby Elaine
           2004. Review of Mourir et renaître. La réception du christianisme par les Inuit de l’Arctique de

l’Est canadien (1890–1940). Canadian Historical Review 85 (1),  http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/canadian_historical_review/v085/85.1morantz.pdf. Accessed Oct 22, 2007.

            Annotations: This Article talks about how the Inuit converted to Christianity after the Europeans arrived. It also talks about how the shamans help in the process. This article is scholarly because it source. Project Muse is a unique collaboration between libraries and publishers.
2  Hart, Craig 

 

           Annotations: This article or site is devoted to helping the Inuit cope with the melting of the sea ice and also it is concerned with the animals. In regards to the Inuit it focuses on Global Warming and how it is a threat to their culture and how they get food.
 Tulloch, Shelley
2004 Inuit Youth: The future of Inuktitut. Electronic Document, http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/aina/14thISCProceedings.pdf, Accessed December 14 2007.
 Annotation: This is a conference by the Artic Institute of North America University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada and this section of the conference by Tulloch, Shelley focues on the language of the Eskimo and that it is changing due to influence of the English language. It talks about how Inuit youths are concerned with their native language disappearing. It scholarly because of the creditials of Tulloch and her collegues.
1998-2004 History of Native Alaska Education. Electronic Document. http://www.alaskool.org/native_ed/native_ed_intro.htm, accessed October 10, 2007.
It is clear that this site was put together by teachers and others involved in education. There are many links on the site that lead to what can be considered scholarly articles. The authors are all professionals who are versed in their subjects and who provide the readers with first-hand information concerning how education has remained the same for Eskimos (Native Alaskans) for roughly 100+ years. This website had many informative articles.
 

 
 
 
 

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