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Examples of citations and abstracts

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 7 months ago

From Abstracts in Anthropology

 

What we see here is a record of a journal article IN PRINT from the database, Abstracts in Anthropology.  Below this table, you will see the proper American Anthropologist citation and abstract format.  Use the format below (as highlighted in red) that you should be using when adding sources to the culture bibliographies.

 

Title: TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND INUIT: REFLECTIONS ON TEK RESEARCH AND ETHICS.
Author(s): Wenzel, G. W.
Source: Arctic
Year: 1999
Volume (Issue): 52(2) pp. 113-124
From original print Abstracts in Anthropology: Volume 44, Issue 3
Abstract: The intimate knowledge that Inuit possess about the environment has figured prominently in North American Arctic research since at least the mid-1960s, when adherents of Julian Steward's adaptationist perspective essentially displaced the acculturation paradigm that until then had dominated Inuit studies. While Nelson's Hunters of the Northern Ice is the prototype of integrating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into the cultural analysis of Inuit, virtually all ecologically framed research on Inuit adaptation since has drawn extensively on TEK, if only as one of several information sources. Recently, however, Inuit and agencies and individuals concerned with the conduct of research in the North have expressed concern about the appropriation of this culturally specific knowledge.

 

 

Wenzel, G.W.

     1999 Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the Inuit: Reflections on Tek Research and Ethics.  Arctic 52(2): 113-124.

 

The intimate knowledge that Inuit possess about the environment has figured prominently in North American Arctic research since at least the mid-1960s, when adherents of Julian Steward's adaptationist perspective essentially displaced the acculturation paradigm that until then had dominated Inuit studies. While Nelson's Hunters of the Northern Ice is the prototype of integrating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into the cultural analysis of Inuit, virtually all ecologically framed research on Inuit adaptation since has drawn extensively on TEK, if only as one of several information sources. Recently, however, Inuit and agencies and individuals concerned with the conduct of research in the North have expressed concern about the appropriation of this culturally specific knowledge.

 

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