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Jaguar - please comment below

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 4 months ago

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth
 
ideology/symbolism: I found this film very simple in that it only focused on one person, whom I found very interesting in how he was telling his version of the myth, Jaguar. The hand gestures, I noticed were important in telling this story for it added more great depth and understanding to the myth.
Symbolism: The noises the young man was making also added great depth to this beautiful myth, for the noises were many times symbolic of the animals involved in this myth. This shows how much the myth means to these people and how much expression they point into its telling. In all, the myth that was told by this unique man gave us all insight into their beliefs and traditions

Ideology: It was obvious that the young man was very comfortable sitting and telling his story around others, including with those who were filming him. This myth is obviously an important myth to these people for the man felt no shame sitting on little piles of sticks telling the myth completely exposed.ideology/symbolism: I found this film very simple in that it only focused on one person, whom I found very interesting in how he was telling his version of the myth, Jaguar. The hand gestures, I noticed were important in telling this story for it added more great depth and understanding to the myth.Symbolism: The noises the young man was making also added great depth to this beautiful myth, for the noises were many times symbolic of the animals involved in this myth. This shows how much the myth means to these people and how much expression they point into its telling. In all, the myth that was told by this unique man gave us all insight into their beliefs and traditionsIdeology: It was obvious that the young man was very comfortable sitting and telling his story around others, including with those who were filming him. This myth is obviously an important myth to these people for the man felt no shame sitting on little piles of sticks telling the myth completely exposed.Daramasiwa (and the Revenge of the Twins)(1)ideology-The film was very simple and consisted only on this one man telling his version of this famous myth but alot could be seen based on his story-telling alone such as their methods of dress and privacy. It is clear that they felt no shame in front of others, even the person filming who must have been somewhat of a stranger. The person speaking in the film is completely exposed but seems completely comfortable to be this way and in the limelight.ideology/symbolism- The story he tells as well as his body movements and sound effects are full of humor. Even with subtitles, his actions make the story engaging and makes this group of people we know nothing about instantly much more charming and friendly. Even the way he is sitting and smiling gives the sense that they are friendly people.ideology/symbolism- The story gives us insight into their beliefs and traditions. This seems to be a story that is well-known throughout their people. It shows their beliefs in higher beings, spirits, and mythology.(2)(3)(4)Jaguar(5)(6)(7)(8)Ideology/Symbolism: I found this film very simple in that it only focused on one person, whom I found very interesting in how he was telling his version of the myth, Jaguar. The hand gestures, I noticed were important in telling this story for it added more great depth and understanding to the myth. Symbolism: The noises the young man was making also added great depth to this beautiful myth, for the noises were many times symbolic of the animals involved in this myth. This shows how much the myth means to these people and how much expression they point into its telling. In all, the myth that was told by this unique man gave us all insight into their beliefs and traditions(9)(10)(11)

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth
 
 
 
 
Film Review: Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth as Told by
Film Info197622 minutescolor
 
 
 
 
 

The richness of Yanomamo mythology is again revealed in this film (compare Moonblood and both Myths of Naro ), as is the remarkable skill of another Yanomamo storyteller. The myth in this case is that of Jaguar, a prominent figure throughout South American Indian mythology.
 
Long ago, Curare Woman tasted bitter, so Jaguar did not eat her. Curare woman hid her pregnant daughter in the roof above Jaguar's hammock, and sent Jaguar far away to hunt while her daughter was fed by birds whom she protected.
One day the daughter pissed all over jaguar. He smelled the urine and smashed the daughter to the ground, killing her.
Curare Woman took the daughter's twin fetuses and hid them in a bark container, where they became hekura spirits. When they grew to be men and became Raware', they sought revenge. Through cunning and with an arrow obtained from the sky's edge, they succeeded in killing Jaguar.
Daramasiwa, who tells the myth, remains hunkering on the ground in one spot, yet through his dramatic body movements and versatile voice he conveys a sense of tremendous distance traveled, and of the qualities of the different characters.
This film, together with the films of the Naro and the Moonblood myths, suggests reflections on the nature of performance and communication in Yanomamo culture. At the same time the films remind the viewer of the complexity of the intellectual system in this culture, and might nicely complement a reading of Claude Levi-Strauss' Mythologiques.
 
Following the film, we will have a discussion on the following topics:
 
Storytelling
Character of the natural environment (resources)
Character and actions of Jaguar
Character and actions of Curare Woman
Character and actions of the Twins
Character of Yanomamo culture
Concept of revenge
Character of Daramasiwa
This film as a reflection of broader cultural phenomena
 

 
Begin your postings here . . .
 
 
[Elen De Oliveira, emd10@geneseo.edu, 10/11]
 
Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth
 
1.
 
2.
 
3.
 
 
[Rebecca Coons, rsc2@geneseo.edu, 10/12]
 
1. Ideology - This is probably one of the most popular Yanomamo myths because this is the second time I've seen this video/heard about this myth. The story-teller is not only comfortable but excited to be sharing a part of his culture. Chagnon's work with the Yanomamo is a great example of how film can be used ethnographically - let the people tell their stories and the record will live forever.
2. Symbolism - Especially after reading about body language, this film demonstrates what an affect it can have on the work. I've read this myth in Chagnon's book but without the man telling the story, it becomes Chagnon's telling of the story and isn't nearly as great as actually seeing it told by the Yanomamo and watching him act out the story with his body and facial expressions (not to mention the character voices).
3. society/religion - It is obvious after seeing this film that their stories and myths are extremely important to the Yanomamo. The man was very excited and told the story in a much more active way than I can remember hearing any stories when I was growing up. Imagine someone telling us Snow White & the 7 Dwarfs and using the same amount of body language, voices, and gestures as this storyteller. It'd give fairy tales new life!
-END-
 
 
(Cameron Mack, cfm6@geneseo.edu, 10/13)
 
Jaguar: Yanamamo Storytelling
 
1. Ideology/Symbolism: The story that is told about Jaguar exemplifies the idea of how important storytelling and ideology are to the Yanomamo. Not only is storytelling an important form of entertainment for them, it is also a key to discovering much about their culture. Within their stories the Yanomamo share much of their culture, however, it is not necessarily always clear or explicit.
2. Environment: The audience can see from the way that the Yanomamo man is conducting himself that they have adapted uniquely to their environment. With little coverage from the dangers of the jungle, much due to the inclimate weather, the Yanomamo know much more that anyone would even care to know about their region. The people of this village view clothing not as something to dress yourself in, but rather something beneficial to them (in regard to their environment).
3. Symbolism: The body language of the storyteller seemed very ecclectic and over-the-top to me. I believe that this is a product of where I was raised, however. Being from an Italian-American background, I am accustom to storytelling, but not necessarily storytelling with acting as well. The Yanomamo man, who is being filmed by Chagnon, takes his time delivering each line and puts emphasis on every part of the story (not even just the important parts, every part!). This seemed so unique to me, that the stroy teller would exhibit such an abundance of emotion during an old legendary story. Coming from a different culture, this is simply my ETIC perspective.
 
 
[Larkin Kimmerer, llk5@geneseo.edu, 10-14-07]
 
1. Ideology: The Yanomamo, as we have read, have a great sense of humor. This could definitely be seen in Daramasiwa's storytelling and the language he used (at least what the subtitles said).
2. Ideology/Symbolism: In a culture where body language is often much more subtle, this was a new way to tell a story--it was as much about the movements as it was about the myth itself.
3. Ideology: Storytelling is a really important part of Yanomamo culture, for entertainment, to pass on information, and explain natural and supernatural phenomena they come into contact with.
 
 
[Dave Roberts, dlr4@geneseo.edu, 10-14]
1.)Symbolism: The story is filled with names and titles which must hold special meaning to the Yanomamo. What is a "Curare Woman?" Who are "herura spirits," or "raware"? Knowing what these names represent and how they fit into Yanomamo culture might make the story make a little more sense.
2.)Environment: To people of our culture, the story of a girl urinating on a jaguar would generally be seen as a humorous kind of tale. Was this story viewed as "funny" by the Yanomamo? The storyteller seemed enthused and lighthearted in his telling of it, so I'm thinking it's is a humorous myth for them as well.
3.)Idealogy: I had to do a double take to make sure that yes- his balls were definitely just dangling there as he told the story. That was a pretty damn concrete confirmation of what Chagnon said about the Yanomamo not really wearing too much of the clothes and whatnot.
 
 

[Dilek Canakci, dc11@geneseo.edu, 10/14]

Jaguar

 

Kinship/Family: The Yanomamo have great family ties and they pass on such myths that they deeply believe in to future generations. The people that tell these myths are mostly men that have probably heard their grandfathers tell when they were little kids.

Environment: The Yanomamo perceive their living conditions as one with nature since they live deep in the Amazon. Everything that they need to live comes from their environment and I think that makes them a very strong group of people.

Ideology/Symbolism: It was obvious that as the man told the story of the myth, he made sure he paid close attention to his body movements and sound effects to help others fully understand the myth.

 

 

[Jennifer Ritzenthaler, jkr5@geneseo.edu, 10/14/07]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

1.Religion/Ritual-The implementation of an animal that the Yanomamo fear and making it appear dumb and silly is an interesting way of attempting to affect reality with myth.

2.Environment-The storyteller’s surroundings are implemented in his telling of the story. He points to the roof and the mountains and places far off to aid in his retelling.

3.Kinship-The relationship between the mother and her daughter is important. Her skill in saving her grandchildren is what led to the continuation of the Yanomamo, according to the myth.

END.

 

 

[Shamiran Warda, sw11@geneseo.edu 10/14]

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

 

Ideology: It was obvious that the young man was very comfortable sitting and telling his story around others, including with those who were filming him. This myth is obviously an important myth to these people for the man felt no shame sitting on little piles of sticks telling the myth completely exposed.

 

 

[Jonathon Baker, jlb22@geneseo.edu, 10/15]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

1. Ideology: I thought it was interesting that Jaguar was portrayed as almost a gullible buffoon, I tend to think of jaguars as elegant and efficient stalkers and hunters, but then again, when was the last time I lived in a rainforest with some.

 

2. Ideology: I wonder if culturally, there is some sort of moral to this story. What could it be? Is it just purely for entertainment purposes? Obviously revenge is one of the main themes, but is this the only thing that the Yanomamo get out of this important story?

 

3. Environment- It is interesting to me how cultures that are “less modern” than ours have animals playing a much greater role in fiction. I suppose this is probably because of their importance as a resource. We don’t deal with the animals that we eat on a daily basis. We also don’t generally deal with animals that threaten our lives.

 

 

-END-

 

 

 

[Anne Kim, ak13@geneseo.edu, 10/16]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

1. I enjoyed this film although it is very different from what I am used to. The method of storytelling was very intriguing. There were lots of movements and sounds involved. This enhanced the story because it was very animated and kept my attention. I feel that if it wasn’t for the motions and sounds, this film would have been a lot duller.

2. The story itself was very interesting because the myth was very graphic. The fact that the tiger found the pregnant woman and killed her is very gruesome and something that I am not used to because pregnant women are cared for the most. In addition, the tiger had no remorse for the baby in her body because he ate the baby without hesitation.

3. The culture of these people can be seen through the way the man tells the story. I can see that this is how many of the stories are passed down from generation to generation.

 

END

 

 

 

[Heather Warren, hrw1@geneseo.edu, 10/17]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

  1. Ideology: The story itself, with its characters and their personalities tell a lot about the Yanomamo people and their beliefs. Animals and nature itself take on anthropomorphic roles, showing us that the Yanomamo view their world as an intelligent, living, influencing presence.
  2. Symbolism: The sounds, stances, and facial expressions along with repetitions of these movements give the story and characters life. It probably also helps everyone remember the stories better as well as the morals and information they convey.
  3. Environment: The story also describes the type of environment that the Yanomamo live in since the story seems to take place right in their own area. It makes sense that they would describe things that they know from their own surroundings to give the story more life and to relate it to themselves.

 

END

 

 

[Steph Aquilina, sma8@geneseo.edu, 10/18]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

1. IDEOLOGY/SYMBOLISM: The Yanomamo storyteller was very expressive and imitated the animal spirits enthusiastically - his animated style illustrates the way in which these stories are still very much alive in their lives.

2. IDEOLOGY/SYMBOLISM: The myth described how jaguar laying very vainly in his hammock blinded him to the pregnant woman hiding above. This reveals the ideal that vanity and ignorance will leave one looking foolish; one must be humble and aware of his or her surroundings.

3. ENVIRONMENT: It is clear that the Yanomamo live in a warm climate where they do not need additional clothing layers for protection. The storyteller seemed to feel very comfortable in his surroundings, as he did not hesitate in gesturing the old tale and squatted on the ground very casually. END

 

 

[Kaitlyn Northrop, krn3@geneseo.edu, 10/19]

 

Ideology/symbolism- I thought it was interesting how the storyteller was very engaging and interested in telling his story with expressions and imitations. This shows that the Yanomamo were very comfortable with the film crew and the anthropologists, enough to tell them about their rituals.

Environment- I thought the way the film was set right in the middle of their house was interesting. This then portrayed their living arrangements and the type of environment they lived in.

Culture- I thought it was interesting how the culture of the Yanomamo can be seen just through the way that the story is told. It shows how prominent and important culture and tradition is in the life of the Yanomamo.

 

END

 

[Lanh Nguyen, ltn2@geneseo.edu, 10/20]

Jaguar Film

1. Symbolism: Body language- animation, enthusiasm, devotion-of the man made the story that much more powerful and remember able

2. Ideology: It’s obvious how important ideology is to the Yanomamo people and how it affects their everyday activities

3. Symbolism: Seeing how these original stories and myths have stayed around for all of these generations, it must mean that family and traditional values are viewed as being EXTREMELY important --- only way of keeping these stories/myths alive

 

END

 

[Lok Yung Yam, ly5@geneseo.edu, 10/20]

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

1. Ideology: I liked the idea that information, in this case, a myth, was passed on through storytelling. It was definitely an experience to see the story being told, as I had never seen someone express more through his/her body language than his/her actual words.

 

2. Symbolism: I was also wondering what the purpose of the story was. It seems as if entertainment was at least somewhat of a factor, because the people listening seemed to genuinely enjoy the story.

 

3. Society: I don't know why I'm the first to comment on this, but was I the only one to notice that the storyteller was naked? It shocked me at first, and then it hit me that being nude was perfectly acceptable in the Yanomamo culture.

 

 

[Adam Saunders, ars11@geneseo.edu , 10/21]

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

The storyteller that we witness telling of this myth uses an amazing amount of body movement and gestures to reinact the myth. By giving the animals and motions of the characters various sound effects and keeps the listener drawn in and hooked on the story as it is being told.

The role of the Jaguar from the standpoint of the Yanomamo is both an animal to be feared and respected. The envirment around them is a location in which they share with the Jaguar. In turn this means they also share the resources with it as well. The Yanomamo in a sense could consider themselves both a preditor and prey to it.

The Yanomamo have no written language so it is essential for myths such as this to be told often to the village people especially to children. The only way that these stories will be passed down is from word of mouth and those who tell its tale.

END

 

{Isobel Connors, icc2@geneseo.edu, 10/21}

 

Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth

 

1. ENVIRONMENT: The Yanomamo man telling the myth of the Jaguar was surrounded by lush forest. The man, and those people surrounding him, is dressed in very few garments. This type of dress suggests that the climate is typically hot and humid.

 

2. IDEOLOGY: The Jaguar is regarded as a very powerful and dangerous force in their society; however, the story suggests that the Yanomamo believe Jaguar lacks cunning and is easily tricked.

 

3. SYMBOLISM/RELIGION: Although I could not understand what the Yanomamo man was saying, his gestures and noises enhanced my understanding of the story. The cinematography made me feel as though I was sitting in front of the man, listening to his animated tale, and experiencing the Yanomamo style of oral history.

 

END.

 

[Dan Lilly, djl5@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

IDEOLOGY: The Yanomamo clearly have a high value on storytelling. I think, in our culture, its a bit of a lost art because our lives being inundated with technology tends to eliminate the need to be able to tell a good, enthralling story. Clearly though, the practice is still prominent among the Yanomamo.

ENVIRONMENT: I thought it was interesting that the storyteller could actually point to the mountain near where the story took place. It shows that they've taken great care with their myths and stories, even setting them in real life places around them.

SYMBOLISM: The gestures and body language used by the storytelling showed great aptitude for using one's body as a visual aid for a spoken story. Even without subtitles, it would have been able to understand portions of the story, such as when Jaguar was covered in urine. It was also very funny.

END

 

[Skye Naslund, sjn1@geneseo.edu, 10/22/07]

“Jaguar: A Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth”

 

1-The symbolism seen in the Yanomamo Twin Cycle Myth of animal noises in fascinating. Animals make different sounds in every language, but the realistic aspect of the sounds in the film demonstrate how close the Yanomamo are to nature.

2-The idea of lack of shame in the Yanomamo culture made me think about our culture. Most people would not tell a story that animatedly in front of an audience, particularly if they were being filmed, solely out of embarrassment.

3-The story was very humorous, which makes me wonder whether it was meant to draw humor from an audience, or it is the cultural discrepancies that make the film so funny.

 

 

Charlie Genao cg7@geneseo.edu  11/06/07

 

1. The story was nice but I think people have to look pass the humor and realize that it is really what they believe in. Chagon is the anthrpogolist that worked with the Yanomamo and it took him alot of work to earn his trust.

2. I saw the film in my Cultural anthropolgy Class and I liked that fact the Yanomamo was giving him false information when he started doing his reasearch. When Chagon found out, he had to throw a year's worth of work because the Yanomamo lied about their customs.

3. In the Film they costantly bothered Chagon for favors and food and things he got so tired of it that he lied to the Yanomamo about the orgins of his food. For example he said that peanut butter was actually dog poop or something so that they would stop. 

 

Alfred Dilluvio ajd12@geneseo.edu 11/06/07

I liked this artistic ethnographic film which seemed good for one reason. It seemed to be relayed solely by one informant. Nothing was included or excluded that the filmmaker decided was important or not. The film was a portrait of what one man was saying about his cultural heritage. The film was full of that which i feel is very important. Cultural Voice.

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