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Yanomamo - Scholarly Research on the Web

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 9 months ago
 

Please include 3 annotated citations to scholarly web resources focused on one of the following topics about the Yanomamo - Tradition and Change, Contact with the West, Economic Organization, Political Organization, Myth, Violence, Spirit World. All citations should be written in American Anthropologist style and placed alphabetically by author last name.

 

American Anthropologist cheat sheet

 


 

Here is an example of how we would like students to provide their information. First, begin with your contact information (name, e-mail address, and date of post) Second, include the citation of your desired material in American Anthropologist style. Third, add your annotation of the scholarly material (what is the item about? In your mind, what makes it scholarly?). An annotation does not need to be more than 2-3 sentences long, but be as complete and thorough as you would like.

 

[K. Hoffman, kdhoffman@geneseo.edu - 8/20]

 

Coe, Michael

2002 Mexico. NY: Thames & Hudson.

 

A thoughtful and informational book covering all aspects of Mexico, including . . . This source can be considered scholarly because Michael Coe is a major authority on all things Mexico and his work has been cited by hundreds of other authors. Coe's specialization is within the field of . . .

 


 

[Dave Roberts, dlr4@geneseo.edu, 10-10]

 

Ramos, Alcida R.

Reflecting of the Yanomami: Ethnographic Images and the Pursuit of the Exotic. http://www.jstor.org/view/08867356/ap020009/02a00020/0.

Electronic Document. accessed October 10, 2007.

 

This article explores the creation of image taking as a resource, focusing on anthropologists who have studied the Yamomamo (Yanomami.) This article is scholarly because it was written by a professor at the University of Brasil and has been cited by a number of scholarly sources.

 

Lizot, J.

Population, Resources and Warfare Among the Yanomami. http://www.jstor.org/view/00251496/dm993905/99p0011q/0.

Electronic Document. accessed October 10, 2007.

 

This article demonstrates how the Yanomami diet and rate of growth has not effected the equilibrium between them and their environment. Lizot has written numerous articles and a book on the Yanomami. This article has been referenced by many scholarly resources.

 

Urban, Greg

Ceremonial Dialogues in South America. http://www.jstor.org/view/00027294/ap020464/02a00050/0?currentResult=00027294%2bap020464%2b02a00050%2b0% 2cAEFB01&searchUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fhttp://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" _fcksavedurl=">http://www.jstor.org" href="http://www.jstor.org" class="linkification-ext">www.jstor.org%2Fsearch%2FBasicResults%3Fhp%3D25%26si%3D1%26gw%3Djtx%26jtxsi%3D1%26jcpsi%3D1%26artsi%3D1%26Query%3Dyanomamo%2Bmyth%26wc%3Don. Electronic Document. accessed October 10, 2007.

 

This articles examines ceremonial dialogue of South American people through the lens of semiotic analysis. Urban, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, has written numerous articles both on the subject of semiotic analysis and discourse and on the people of South America. This article has been cited by many scholarly resources.

 

[Lanh Nguyen, ltn2@geneseo.edu, 10/13]

Yanomamo Websites:

1. This website is small but it covers the location, history, social organizations (kinship, political organization), traditions, myths, and much more about the Yanomamos. This site is scholarly because both of the editors used Chagnon, a well acknowledged anthropologist, as their reference. Also, this site is a part of Minnesota State University.

Adam Kittelson & Amy Stafford
2007.  Yanomamo. Electronic Document, http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/southamerica/yonomamo.html, accessed October 13, 2007.
2.       This site explores the important aspects of Yanomamo culture. It has a large section on their economic activities and their changing culture, among others.  This site is scholarly because it was taken from a major anthropological textbook with creditable editors and authors.
Raymond Hames
1995. Yanomamo, Varying Adaptations of Foraging Horticulturalists. Electronic document, http://www.unl.edu/rhames/212/YANREADG.htm, accessed October 13, 2007.
3.       This website is AMAZING!! It provides a series of films by Asch and Chagnon on different aspects of Yanomamo life. From bride services to myths, the films cover SO MUCH! This site is no doubt scholarly. It states in its goals and purpose is to “provide info about the documentary films.” There’s thorough background check on the staffs and contributors, contact numbers and e-mails for further help. PLUS, we watched one of these films in class. 
Documentary Educational Resources
2007. Documentary Films: The Yanomamo Series. Electronic document, http://www.der.org/films/yanomamo-series.html, accessed October 13, 2007.
END
[Elen De Oliveira, emd10@geneseo.edu, 10/15]
1. Chambers, Erve
1981. The Yanomamo and Other Causes: The Ethics of Concern. Anthrosource. Electronic document. accessed 15 October 2007
http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/pdfplus/10.1525/ahu.1981.6.2-3.25
Abstract:  In this article, the author goes over the reasons behind the attraction towards people such as the yanomamo and how many of us, including anthropologists have preconcieved ideas about what the people are like before they are even seen.  He explains that it is our "longing for freedom and wildness

" ourselves. The article was aquired from anthrosource, a recommended resource by Milne Library and the article was written by a professor at the University of South Florida. The article is pretty old, but it is not likely that the information is out of date because the subjects in question have not been around for many years.

2. Loewer, Aaron
2003. Preserving, Restoring, Integrating: Educational Practices of the Yanomamo, Ojibway, and Aborigines in Contemporary Society. Proquest. Electronic document. accessed 15 October 2007.
http://fb7hk6nl8u.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&atitle=Preserving,%20restoring,%20integrating:%20Educational%20practices%20of%20the%20Yanomamo,%20Ojibway,%20and%20Aborigines%20in%20contemporary%20society&title=Educational%20Technology%20Research%20and%20Development&issn=10421629&date=6/27/2003&volume=51&issue=2&%20spage=83&authors=Aaron%20Loewer
Abstract:  This article gives an overview of the yanomamo, along with other aborigines in contemporary society.  It highlights traditional and contemporary practices of the yanomamo and explained how they have endured so much change while preserving much of their culture.  Current yanomamo culture is explained as well as an overview of yanomamo history.  It is an up to date article from a published journal and references are listed.
3.  Chagnon, Napoleon A.
Yanomamö warfare, social organization and marriage alliances. ehraf, collection of ethnography. electronic document. accessed 15 October 2007http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?type=boolean;c=ehrafe;ocm2op=and;ocm3op=and;op2=and;op3=and;rgn=paragraphs;owc=SQ18;view=doc;start=1;size=25;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-010;section=CITE;citeformat=long
Abstract: From this webpage you can access all of the pages of Chagnon's book which covers an extensive amount of information on the yanomamo from kinship and marriage, to village size and demography, to warfare and beyond.  It is not up to date at all, being written in the 1930's but the information seems very reliable and came from a resource center recommended by milne library. There is a huge amount of information and references are listed.
 

[Larkin Kimmerer, llk5@geneseo.edu, 10-15-07]

Yanomamo Citations

 

Kittelson, Adam and Amy Stafford

Yanomamo. Electronic Document, http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/southamerica/yonomamo.html. Accessed October 15, 2007

This website is a link from the Minnesota State University E-Museum, and it seems to be written by students. However, it is a good synopsis of some parts of Yanomamo culture and cites Chagnon, so it seems like a reliable, if not entirely scholarly, source.

Schwimmer, Brian

1995 The Yanomamo. Electronic Document, http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo/. Accessed October 15, 2007

This website has links to information on different aspects of Yanomamo kinship and marriage, complete with kinship charts and terminology. The author, Brian Schwimmer, is a professor of anthropology at University of Manitoba, so it is a legitimate source.

Survival International

Yanomami. Electronic Document, http://www.survival-international.org/tribes/yanomami. Accessed October 15, 2007

This website is for an organization called Survival International, whose slogan is “The movement for tribal peoples.” It has basic information as well as information about the organization’s work with the Yanomamo. It also has a lot of pictures and videos, as well as news links about the Yanomamo.

END

 

 

 

 

[Jonathon Baker, jlb22@geneseo.edu, 10/17]

 

Scholarly Research: Yanomamo

 

Ferguson, Brian R.

2001 10,000 Years of Tribal Warfare: History, Science, Ideology, and the ‘State of Nature.’ University of Michigan. Electronic Document, http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/journal/vol8no3/ferguson.html , accessed October 17, 2007.

 

This article describes how the Yanomamo are our “modern ancestors.” They are much like how we might have been at the start of agriculture. It then goes on to describe their constant warfare and a brief history about what we know that has happened in their homeland since we have made contact with them. The article can be trusted as scholarly because it was written by a distinguished professor at Rutgers and the article is on the University of Michigan’s website.

Chernela, Janet

2001 Yanomami of Venezuela: New Findings and Concerns. American Anthropological Association. Electronic Document, http://www.aaanet.org/committees/cfhr/rptyano9.htm, accessed October 17, 2007.

 

This article describes several concerns facing the Yanomamo, most importantly, loss of land. They will lose a ton of land that they need to hunt and gather in if nothing is done about current situations. The article is scholarly because it appears on the AAA website and was written by a professional anthropologist.

 

Prance, Ghillean T.

2001 The Ethnobotany of the Yanomamo Indians. University of Hawaii. Electronic Document, http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/era/vol1/I1547-3465-01-043.pdf, accessed October 17, 2007.

 

This article provides a brief summary of the current plight of Yanomamo in the different regions of their homeland. It talks about how the gold miners have brought in malaria that has killed a number of families. It is a scholarly article as it appears in a journal at the University of Hawaii.

-END-

 

 

 

[Dilek Canakci, dc11@geneseo.edu, 10/18]

 

Three sources on Yanomamo

Chagnon, Napoleon.

1996 Yanomami Warfare: A Political History. American Anthropologist 98(3):670-672). Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2085/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.1996.98.3.02a00500?prevSearch=yanomamo, accessed October 18, 2007.

This article discusses the reasons why certain wars break out among the Yanomamo and the cultural disagreements that the tribes have among each other. It also discusses the history and present of their political system.

Chambers, Erve.

1981 The Yanomamo and Other Causes: The Ethics of Concern. Anthropology & Humanism Quarterly 6(2-3)25-29. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2085/doi/abs/10.1525/ahu.1981.6.2-3.25?prevSearch=yanomamo, accessed October 19, 2007.

This source is about the lifestyle of the Yanomamo and how they are facing a steady erosion and eventual destruction of their traditional ways of life. It discusses the problems that they may be facing in the future and the changes that may come with these problems.

Turner, Terence.

1998 Sanuma Memories: Yanomamo Ethnography in Times of Crisis. American Ethnologist 25(1):59-60. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2085/doi/abs/10.1525/ae.1998.25.1.59?prevSearch=yanomami, accessed October 18, 2007.

This article discusses the relationship of the Amazonian tribes with the Brazilian society and culmination in a harrowing description of the impact of a massive epidemic of malaria brought on by invading gold miners. It also discusses the changes and progresses that the tribes have had in the past 25 years. END

 

 

 


[Heather Warren, hrw1@geneseo.edu, 10/19]

 

 

Yanomamo Web Sources

 

 

Ferguson, R. Brian

2000 The Causes and Origins of “Primitive Warfare”: on Evelved Motivations for War. Electronic document, http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/anthropological_quarterly/v073/73.3ferguson.pdf, accessed October 19, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This document discusses warfare in several “primitive” societies including the Yanomamo. This site is scholarly because it is from a scholarly publication Anthropological Quarterly. Furthermore, there are extensive sources used by the author. In addition, the author is a well-known scholar and has published both papers and books ( searched Google Scholar ). Finally, the author is also a professor at Rutgers University, Newark.

 

 

Levine, Laura

2006 Yanomamo Myths. Electronic document, http://der.org/resources/study-guides/three-yanomamo-myths.pdf, accessed October 19, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This document is the transcripts for several films on the Yanomamo and their myths. It is scholarly because the website, Documentary Educational Resources, is an institution, working in collaboration with the Smithsonian, that promotes quality ethnographic and documentary films. This document is a study guide on several films created by two well-known anthropologists, Napoleon A. Chagnon and Timothy Asch. All resources used for this guide are credited. Furthermore, the document is recent as it was added to the website in 2006 (checked study-guides directory to find out).

 

 

Rouch, Salle Jean

2007 Hommage à Timothy Asch. Electronic document, http://www.comite-film-ethno.net/Bilan/bilan2007/timothy-asch.html, accessed October 19, 2007.

 

 

Abstract: This website is a tribute to the ethnographer Timothy Asch, a well-known photographer and anthropologist. Though the sources for the biography are lacking, there are some great videos of the Yanomamo and their practices as well as a list of films for further research. The site is very recent and kept up to date. The site is in French, but I used google to translate the page. The page (The Committee for Ethnographic Film) is founded by the Musée de l’Homme ( Museum of Man ) in Paris, France.

 

 

-END-


(Cameron Mack, cfm6@geneseo.edu, 10/20)

 

Yanomamo Scholarly Research

 

 

Chagnon, Napoleon.

1996 Yanomami Warfare: A Political History. American Anthropologist 98(3): 670-672. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2085/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.1996.98.3.02a00500?prevSearch=yanomamo, accessed October 20, 2007.

This is a valuable piece of work from Napoleon Chagnon, a renowned anthropologist. Everything in this piece is very trustworthy and definately can be trusted as a scholarly resource.

Ferguson, Brian R.

2001 10,000 Years of Tribal Warfare: History, Science, Ideology, and the “State of Nature”. University of Michigan. Electronic document, http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/journal/vol8no3/ferguson.html, accessed October 20, 2007.

Ferguson is a professor in the department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rutgers University, making this article immediately scholarly. Within his journal he discusses the history, science, and ideology of the indigenous people.

Schwimmer, Brian

1995 The Yanomamo. Electronic document, http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo, accessed October 20, 2007.

Along with the last site I used, this source was compiled by a professor (from the University of Manitoba). There are five links within the site, encompassing an intro, and separate articles concerning lineage organization, marriage, kinship terminology, and intergroup relationships. This was a very useful site that featured many scholarly participants, including Napoleon Chagnon, Peter Biella, and Gary Seaman.

 

 

 

 

 

[Steph Aquilina, sma8@geneseo.edu, 10/20]

Yanomamo scholarly research

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A.

1967. Yanomamö warfare, social organization and marriage alliances. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:3731/cgi/e/ehraf/ehrafidx?

c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18010;owc=SQ18;start=1;size=25;section=cite;sectbyte=1602927978, accessed October 20, 2007.

 

This paper explores how traditional Yanomamo marriage practices differ as a function of kinship ties, political alliances, and military strategies. This is a scholarly source because the author is well-known in the anthropological field and has published numerous other books and articles about the Yanomamo, including those in reputable journals. I located this document in the eHRAF database.

 

 

Early, John D. and Peters, John F.

1990. The population dynamics of the Mucajai Yanomama. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:3731/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?

c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-012;owc=SQ18;start=1;size=25;section=cite;sectbyte=1602963269, accessed October 20,2007.

 

This paper discusses research on the Yanomamo over a 28-year period, examining political structure, reproductive behavior, population dynamics, migration, age-sex correlations, marriage and post-contact influences. It is scholarly because it includes an extensive reference list and both authors have published other scholarly material.

 

 

Becher, Hans.

1960. The Surara and Pakidai, two Yanoama tribes in northwest Brazil. Electronic document, http://proxy.geneseo.edu:3731/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-

idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-002;owc=SQ18, accessed October 20, 2007.

 

This paper examines Yanomamo technology and material culture, life cycles, political and economic structure, and spirituality and ideology. This material is scholarly because it is derived from the author’s many years of experience living with the Yanomamo. END

 

[Jennifer Ritzenthaler, jkr5@geneseo.edu, 10/22/07]

Yanomamo Websites

 

1.

Colchester, Marcus

2004 ‘La Fumee du Metal’: The health impacts of contact. Electronic document, http://www.wrm.org.uy/bulletin/

87/health.html, accessed October 20, 2007.

 

A website focusing on the changes brought to the Yanomamo with their introduction to the western world. This ranges from epidemics to environmental deterioration. This website could be considered scholarly since the author is part of the Forest Peoples Programme whose article was part of World Rainforest Movement bulletin. It also quotes Bruce Albert, who wrote about the Yanomamo, and also has a link to more detailed information on the present situation of the Brazilian Yanomami.

 

2.

Peters, John F. 1998 Life Among the Yanomami: The Story of Change Among the Xilixanaq on the Mucajai River in Brazil.

Electronic document, http://books.google.com/books?id=oJdWPOMtGxQC&pg=PA41&lpg=PA41&dq=yanomamo

+contact+with+the+west&source=web&ots=3UWZXh4Ogb&sig=czqguUlSXkfTcYqkMKOUS6gNsNY - PPP1,M1,

accessed October 20, 2007.

 

An informative web-book, covering many aspects of Yanomamo life, including the culture’s clash with the West, village life and social culture, everyday means of survival, family and social organizations, myths, and magic. It focuses intently upon the Xilixana in the past and present, and how they have changed after contact with missionaries. This source can be considered scholarly since it was written by a Professor of Sociology and Anthropology and it contains a long index and many sources. It also contains maps, pictures, figures, and helpful tables.

 

3.

Raymond Hames

1995 Yanomamo, Varying Adaptations of Foraging Horticulturalists. Electronic document, http://www.unl.edu/

rhames/212/YANREADG.htm, accessed October 20, 2007.

 

An interesting article that looks at Yanomamo location, geography, settlement patterns, economics, technology, kinship, social organization, politics, and change. It could be considered a scholarly since it was originally prepared for the “Just in Time Anthropology” series, with supplemental readings for Ember and Ember’s “Anthropology,” 8th edition. It uses tables, graphs, maps, and pictures to supplement the text.

 

END.

 

[Dan Lilly, djl5@geneseo.edu, 10/22/07]

Yanomamo Scholarly Research

 

Faculty Staff Christian Fellowship: University of Texas at Arlington

    1999 Questions and Answers for Timoteo Shoofoot at UT Arlington, October 6, 1999. Electronic document. http://fscf.uta.edu/timoteoqa.htm, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

The Q&A session for Shoofoot, a Yanomamo, has a definite religious focus, but still is very interesting. It seems that Shoefoot is not only a Yanomamo but also a Christian, the result of missionaries among the Yanomamo. The questions often refer to his speaking tour that was underway at the time. He says that Christianity first came to his village in 1960, and after some initial resentment, the majority of the village has become Christian.

 

Borofsky, Robert

    2005 Yanomami: The Fierce Controversy and What We Can Learn From It. Berkley: University of Claifornia Press. Electronic document. https://www.publicanthropology.net/e-book/download/yanomami-chapter11.pdf, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

The title controversy Borofsky writes about refers to the allegations against anthropologists, particularly against Lizot,Pet of inappropriate sexual relationships with the Yanomami. Specifically, Borofsky wishes less to assign blame to anyone responsible and more to find ways to avoid such controversies in the future. Borofsky is a professor at Hawaii Pacific University.

 

Peters, John F.

    1998 Life Among the Yanomami. Broadview Press. Electronic document. http://books.google.com/books?id=oJdWPOMtGxQC&pg=PA271&lpg=PA271&dq=yanomamo+(culture%7Chistory%7Creligion%7Csociety)+

-com&source=web&ots=3UW_OlaFd4&sig=lRDWJu0gE-iwO1rWsmlOqlfbnLM#PPA7,M1, accessed October 22, 2007

 

Peters seeks to identify the Yanamami culture through its history and social change. Peters originally came to the Yanomami as a missionary, but then returned to the US to obtain a degree in anthropology and committed himself to studying their culture. Peters is now a retired anthropology professor.

 

END

 

[Shamiran Warda, sw11@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

 

Adam Kittelson & Amy Stafford

 

2007 Yanomamo. Electronic Document. http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/southamerica/yonomamo.html, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This website exposes the reader to numerous aspects of the Yanomamo culture, from their location to their history and daily life. This website is scholarly because the information provided was actually taken from an anthropological textbook with creditable editors and authors. In addition, it is well organized and very easy to use.

 

Ferguson, Brian R.

 

2001 10,000 Years of Tribal Warfare: History, Science, Ideology, and the “State of Nature”. University of Michigan. Electronic Document. http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/journal/vol8no3/ferguson.html, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This website discusses the Yanomamo history, science and ideology as well as how they are seen as savages because of their warfare ways. In all, I found everything Ferguson wrote about very interesting. This webpage is scholarly because Ferguson’s work got published in a journal: The Journal of the International Institute. In addition, Ferguson is a well known professor in the department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rutgers University, thus he has been studying such topics for years. Furthermore, he has written other work pieces some even seen in jstor and this indicated that this man is again well respected and his information can be trusted.

 

Schwimmer, Brian

 

1995 The Yanomamo. Electronic Document. http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo/, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This website was very interesting for it covered various interesting topics such as lineage organization, marriage, kinship terminology and intergroup relationships of the Yanomamo people. What makes this website a scholarly webpage is the fact that the author Brian Schwimmer is a known professor of anthropology at the University of Manitoba, thus the information provided can be trusted. In addition, the website contains beautiful pictures that go with the reading that better help the reader understand what is going on such, as seen in the lineage organization link provided. Furthermore, links in the reading are also provided, where if the reader is still unsure what is going on he or she can click on the word and more information will be provided. Overall, great webpage with very useful information.

 

 {Isobel Connors, icc2@geneseo.edu, 10/22}

 

Kittelson, Adam and Amy Stafford

Yanomamo.  Electronic document, http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/southamerica/yonomamo.html, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This site outlines the daily life of the Yanomamo and gives a very brief summary of their history.  The site is scholarly because it is associated with Minnesota State University, and the authors of the page reference the anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon.

 

Biella, Peter, Napoleon A. Chagnon, and Gary Seaman

1997 The Yanomamo.  Electronic document, http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo/, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This site offers information on Yanomamo lineage organization, marriage, kinship terminology, and intergroup relations.  The website is reputable because it was created by anthropologists who are experienced in studying the Yanomamo, including Napoleon Chagnon, who lived with them for a period of time.

 

Schwimmer, Brian

2003 Yanomamo Marriage.  Electronic document, http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo/, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This site gives an overview of kinship and marriage patterns among the Yanomamo.  The website is scholarly in that it was written by a professor of anthropology at the University of Manitoba.

 

END.

 

 

 

Yanomamo

 

[Anne Kim, ak13@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A.

2005 Yanomamö warfare, social organization and marriage alliances, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-010;owc=SQ18, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

                In this study, Chagnon found that a situation of extreme aggression characterized intra-tribal relations among the Yanoama of the Mavaca Basin of Venezuela. Warfare is most frequent and fierce between villages that have developed from such splits. The most frequent cause for conflict is the shortage of women. Alliances between villages are very unstable because of the frequency of warfare. Chagnon found that this high level of conflict was not at all characteristic of the Yanoama of the Uraricaa River area in northern Brazil.

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A.

2005 Yanomamö: the fierce people, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-011;owc=SQ18, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

The Yanoama in the tropical forest between the Rio Negro and the Orinoco, live on the cultivation of various food plants, of which plantains are of major importance. This book describes Yanoama society as characterized by a state of chronic warfare that determines not only inter-village but also intra-village and intra-family relationships.

 

Schuster, Meinhard

1995 The sociology of the Waica, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-001;owc=SQ18, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This study, based on the author's field experience, discusses antagonistic and friendly inter-community relationships, as well as social groups within the village community. The latter are observed during a gift-giving ceremony, family groups during internal migrations, and in case of establishment of a new village community.

 

END

 

 

[Kaitlyn Northrop, krn3@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

 

Yanomamo Research

 

 

 

 

 

Ferguson, Brian R.

 

2001 10,000 Years of Tribal Warfare: History, Science, Ideology, and the “State of Nature”. University of Michigan. Electronic Document. http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/journal/vol8no3/ferguson.html, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This website discusses aspects of yanomamo history and things such as culture, tradiitions, rituals, beliefs, etc.  This article could be considered scholarly because it is written by a professor and therefore is of scholarly value.

 

 

-END-

 

 

Schwimmer, Brian

2003 Yanomamo Marriage. Electronic document, http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/case_studies/yanomamo/, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

This site gives an overview of kinship and marriage patterns among the Yanomamo. The website is scholarly in that it was written by a professor of anthropology at the University of Manitoba.

 

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A.

2005 Yanomamö: the fierce people, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-011;owc=SQ18, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

 This book describes the Yanomamo society and its state of warfare as well as relationships among families and villages.  It is considered scholarly because it is written by a man who studied the Yanomamo extensively and therefore, he has a firsthand account of what actually happened.

 

[Lok Yung Yam, ly5@geneseo.edu, 10/22]

 

 

Booth, William

1989 Warfare over Yanomamö Indians. Science 243(4895):1138-1140. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This article is about the conflict between the Brazilian government and the Yanomamo over gold mines found in their territory. This is a scholarly source because it was published in a scientific journal.

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A., Philip Le Quesne, and James M. Cook

1971 Yanomamo Hallucinogens: Anthropological, Botanical, and Chemical Findings. Current Anthropology 12 (1): 72+73-74. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This article describes the hallucinogens the Yanomamo use in their rituals. It also delves into its significance in Yanomamo culture and the reason behind their use. The botanical aspect of the hallucinogens is also discussed. This is scholarly because it appears in an anthropological journal and has works cited.

 

Ferguson, R. Brian

1989 Do Yanomamo Killers Have More Kids?. American Ethnologist 16(3): 564-565. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: This article attempts to explain why Yanomamo men who have killed more people tended to have more children. It also goes briefly into human psychology as a whole and describes what people look for in a mate. This is scholarly because it was published in an anthropological journal, and appears on JSTOR.

 

 

 

Alfred Dilluvio ajd12@geneseo.edu 10/22

 

Yanomamo

2007. Yanomamo. Electronic Document. http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/southamerica/yonomamo.html, accessed October 20, 2007.

This website appears to be scholarly because of the sources cited at the bottom of the article. The authors also appear to have written other works about the Yanomamo.

 

Raymond Hames

1995. Yanomamo, Varying Adaptations of Foraging Horticulturalists. Electronic document, http://www.unl.edu/rhames/212/YANREADG.htm, accessed October 20, 2007.

 This article originally appeared in an anthropology journal so it is scholarly. The inclusion of charts and graphs suggest that the author compiled their data about the Yanomamo themselves.

 

Chagnon, Napoleon A.

2005 Yanomamö warfare, social organization and marriage alliances, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?c=ehrafe;view=doc;subview=ocm;id=SQ18-010;owc=SQ18, accessed October 22, 2007.

 

Abstract: In this study, Chagnon found that a situation of extreme aggression characterized intra-tribal relations among the Yanoama of the Mavaca Basin of Venezuela. Among these Yanoama Indians villages split frequently due to conflicts between residents. Warfare is most frequent and fierce between villages that have developed from such splits. The most frequent cause for conflict is the shortage of women. Alliances between villages are very unstable because of the frequency of warfare. Chagnon found that this high level of conflict was not at all characteristic of the Yanoama of the Uraricaa River area in northern Brazil.

 

This article is scholarly because it was written in a compilation of ethnography.

 

 

 

 

Charlie Genao cg7@geneseo.edu 10/23/07

 

Revision notes

2003 Myth in Yanomamo Society. Eletronic Document http://www.revision-notes.co.uk/revision/612.html  accessed October 22 07.

 

Annotation: It is scholary because it is talking about the myths and supertitions. One myth that I like in particular is that they think they are the real humans while everybody else is like degraded copies which I find interesting and funny but not stupid funny okay. According to this website thier culture pretty much focuses on sex warfare fighting and insulting. This site is scholarly because it is created by a well known univsrsity in the U.K

 

 

Levine, Laura 

 

Three Yanomamo Myths. Electronic Document http://der.org/resources/study-guides/three-yanomamo-myths.pdf , accessed December 14, 2007.

 

Annotation: This is scholary because it is a organization and a documentary. It focuses on the Three myths in detail  and it explians that the myths are not told in a linear way rather bits and pieces are told when the need arises.

 

Voorhies, Barbara

1973 Possible Social Factors in the Exchange System of the Prehistoric Maya. American Antiquity 38(4): 486-489. JSTOR, 

http://www.jstor.org,  Accessed December 14, 2007.

 

Annotation:It is talking about political systems and how it all connects to Yanomano culture. The article focuses on the Maya but she compares the Maya culture with the Yanomano culture and it focuses on its similarties and differences. I think it is scholarly becasue it is from JSTOR.

 

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[Dan McConvey, dpm5@geneseo.edu 10/23/07]

 

 

Hames, Raymond

1995 Sanumá Memories: Yanomami Ethnography in a Time of Crisis. Electronic Document, http://jpe.library.arizona.edu/volume_4/hamesvol4.htm, accessed on October 23, 2007.

 

Annotation:

                This website is a detailed analysis of the Yanamami through time as a warlike culture.  This website goes step-by-step through the history of the Yanomami subset, Sanuma.  This analysis talks of colonial influences, marriage patterns, and the social significance of personal names.  The paper also reflects on the effects of the the Age of Gold and Misery.

                This website is scholarly because it appears in the Journal of Political Ecology: Case Studies in History and Society and because it is written by Raymond Hames of the Anthropology Department in the University of Nebraska.

 

 

Ferguson , R. Brian

                2001    10,000 Years of Tribal Warfare: History, Science, Ideology and "The State of Nature".  Electronic Document, http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/journal/vol8no3/ferguson.html, accessed on October 23, 2007.

 

 

This website is a the keynote speech of a professor.  He offers interesting insight in how America started as a nation built on war and then goes into a deep analysis of the Yanomamo’s warring history over the past 10,000 years.  The article goes through all of the colonial influences and talks of wars between tribes.  This is interesting because this account goes before the written accounts of the Yanomamo.

                This website is scholarly because it is a professor in the department of Anthropology and Sociology at Rutger’s University giving a keynote speech on "Science, Ethics, Power: Controversy over the Production of Knowledge and Indigenous Peoples.”  This speech is also present on the journal of the International Institute website.  Which adds to its credibility.

 

 

 

Marcus Banks

 1997 Yanomamö Interactive: The Ax Fight. Electronic Document, http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue8/reviews/banks.html, accessed on October 23,     2007.

 

 

Annotation:

                This website is an overview of “The Ax fight” which is a film created by Napoleon Chagnon and Gary Seaman in 1974.  This website is an article analyzing the film from many different perspectives.  This article introduces information that wasn’t available when the film was created and also, due to these new additions, suggests watching the film in a different way.  In some cases the “layered approach” is used where 5 specific parts of the film are to be watched in sequential order as to emphasize certain points.

                This is a scholary article in it nature of referencing so many credible sources and also that this article appears on the internet archeology e-journal website.  This website only chooses the and publishes articles of “high academic standing.”

 

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